Public Notice

Welcome to the City of Toronto's Public Notice website.

The City gives notice to the public on a variety of different matters, such as fees and charges, heritage designations, renaming of roads, and sale of property.

The City also gives notice through the newspaper, mail, or personal service, depending on legislation.

Current notices are listed below by date of posting. You can search for a current notice by word, phrase, topic, municipal ward, and/or date. You can also search past notices and access open data by clicking Search & Open Data.

Current Notices

Current Notices

Notice Date

2022-06-24

    Total Records Found: 34

    Legend

    This extract of Notices is published for reference convenience. Only those Notices that have an address or location focus are listed. Please refer to the list of notices for complete list of current or archived notices.

    Mapped Notices

    Notice of Passing - 245 Queen Street East

    more

    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 572-2022 to designate the property at 245 Queen Street East (including the convenience address at 251 Queen Street East) (Ward 13 Toronto Centre) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 245 Queen Street East Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Passing of By-Law - 78 Ontario Street, 90 Ontario Street and 410 Richmond Street East

    more

    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 571-2022 to designate the property at 78 Ontario Street (including the convenience address at 82 Ontario Street) and 90 Ontario Street and 410 Richmond Street East (Ward 13 Toronto Centre) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 78 Ontario Street Toronto Ontario
    • 90 Ontario Street Toronto Ontario
    • 410 Richmond Street East Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Passing - 384 Richmond Street East

    more

    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 573-2022 to designate the property at 384 Richmond Street East (Ward 13 Toronto Centre) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 384 Richmond Street East Toronto Ontario

    City's Residential Retrofit Program

    more

    Individual By-laws for each of the benefitting properties listed below have been enacted for the meeting of City Council held on June 15 and 16, 2022. Review By-law details.

    Each of these By-laws imposes a special charge on each of the corresponding benefitting properties as a result of the property having entered into a Property Owner Agreement with the City and having undertaken energy efficiency and/or water conservation works as local improvements under the Residential Retrofit Program authorized by Executive Committee Item EX33.22, as adopted by Council on July 16, 17, 18 and 19, 2013 and enacted in By-law 1105-2013 (July 19, 2013).

    The benefitting properties are:

    • 30 Fernwood Park Avenue
    • 69 Alcina Avenue
    • 91 Barker Avenue

    • 30 Fernwood Park Avenue Toronto Ontario
    • 69 Alcina Avenue Toronto Ontario
    • 91 Barker Avenue Toronto Ontario

    Notice of proposal to name the westerly extension of the existing public highway, "Commissioners Street", west of Cherry Street as “Commissioners Street"

    more

    To consider a proposal to name the westerly extension of the existing public highway, "Commissioners Street", west of Cherry Street as “Commissioners Street ".

                                                                                                                         

    At its meeting to be held by video conference and in person in Council Chamber, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, on June 29, 2022, at 9:30 a.m., or shortly afterwards, the Toronto and East York Community Council will hear in person or by his or her counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who claims that his or her lands will be prejudicially affected by the naming and who applies to be heard with respect to the proposed naming.

     

    To obtain additional information, submit comments or to address the Toronto and East York Community Council meeting on June 29, 2022, please contact the following City official no later than 12:00 p.m. on June 28, 2022.

     

    Ellen Devlin

    Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council

    City Clerk’s Office

    Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West

    2nd floor, West Tower

    Toronto, Ontario M5H 2N2

    Telephone: 416-392-7033; Fax: 416-397-0111

    E-mail: teycc@toronto.ca 

     

    Notice to People Writing or Making Presentations to the Toronto and East York Community Council: The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its Committees and Boards. The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City’s website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it - such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address - available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

     

    Many Committee, Board, and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view. If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast. Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available.

     

     

    • Commissioner Street & Cherry Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of proposal to name the realignment of the existing public highway, "Cherry Street", between Polson Street and Commissioners as “Cherry Street"

    more

     

    To consider a proposal to name the realignment of the existing public highway, "Cherry Street", between Polson Street and Commissioners as “Cherry Street".

                                                                                                                         

    At its meeting to be held by video conference and in person in Council Chamber, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, on June 29, 2022 at 9:30 a.m., or shortly afterwards, the Toronto and East York Community Council will hear in person or by his or her counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who claims that his or her lands will be prejudicially affected by the naming and who applies to be heard with respect to the proposed naming.

     

    To obtain additional information, submit comments or to address the Toronto and East York Community Council meeting on June 29, 2022, please contact the following City official no later than 12:00 p.m. on June 28, 2022.

     

     

    Ellen Devlin

    Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council

    City Clerk’s Office

    Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West

    2nd floor, West Tower

    Toronto, Ontario M5H 2N2

    Telephone: 416-392-7033; Fax: 416-397-0111

    E-mail: teycc@toronto.ca 

     

    Notice to People Writing or Making Presentations to the Toronto and East York Community Council: The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its Committees and Boards. The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City’s website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it - such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address - available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

     

    Many Committee, Board, and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view. If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast. Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available.

    • Cherry Street & Polson Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of proposal to rename an existing public highway, Lower Coxwell Avenue, extending between Queen Street East and Lake Shore Boulevard East as “Emdaabiimok Avenue"

    more

    CITY OF TORONTO

     

    NOTICE IS GIVEN THAT THE CITY OF TORONTO WILL CONSIDER WHETHER TO PASS A BY-LAW TO AUTHORIZE THE RENAMING OF AN EXISTING PUBLIC HIGHWAY IN THE TORONTO AND EAST YORK COMMUNITY COUNCIL AREA

      

    CITY OF TORONTO ACT, 2006 - PUBLIC NOTICE

     

    TORONTO AND EAST YORK COMMUNITY COUNCIL AREA

     

    To consider a proposal to rename Lower Coxwell Avenue, extending between Queen Street East and Lake Shore Boulevard East as “Emdaabiimok Avenue".

                                                                                                                         

    At its meeting to be held by video conference and in person in Council Chamber, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, on June 29, 2022, at 9:30 a.m., or shortly afterwards, the Toronto and East York Community Council will hear in person or by his or her counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who claims that his or her lands will be prejudicially affected by the naming and who applies to be heard with respect to the proposed naming.

     

    To obtain additional information, submit comments or to address the Toronto and East York Community Council meeting on June 29, 2022, please contact the following City official no later than 12:00 p.m. on June 28, 2022.

     

    Ellen Devlin

    Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council

    City Clerk’s Office

    Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West

    2nd floor, West Tower

    Toronto, Ontario M5H 2N2

    Telephone: 416-392-7033; Fax: 416-397-0111

    E-mail: teycc@toronto.ca

     

    Notice to People Writing or Making Presentations to the Toronto and East York Community Council: The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its Committees and Boards. The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City’s website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it - such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address - available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

     

    Many Committee, Board, and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view. If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast. Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available.

    • Lower Coxwell Avenue & Queen Street East Toronto Ontario
    • Lake Shore Boulevard East & Lower Coxwell Avenue Toronto Ontario

    Notice of proposal to pass a by-law to realign the boundary of Permit Parking area "8D" to exclude the development address of 46 and 48 Laing Street

    more

     

    Public Notice

     

    Realignment of Permit Parking Area "8D"

     

    Notice is hereby given that Toronto and East York Community Council proposes to pass a by-law to realign the boundary of Permit Parking area "8D" to exclude the development address of 46 and 48 Laing Street.

     

    The meeting of the Toronto and East York Community Council will be held on June 29, 2022 at 9:30 a.m., or shortly afterwards and will meet by video conference and in person in Council Chamber, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West.

     

    Any objections regarding this proposal should be set out in writing and forwarded to the City Clerk, Attention: Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, City of Toronto, Secretariat Division, City Hall, 100 Queen Street W, 2nd floor West Tower, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, or by E-mail: teycc@toronto.ca.

     

    If you wish to make a presentation to the Community Council regarding this proposal, please phone 416-392-7033 or e-mail teycc@toronto.ca by 12:00 p.m. on June 28, 2022, so that we can include your name on the list of speakers and provide you with instructions on how to participate in the meeting.

     

    Notice to People Writing or Making Presentations to the Toronto and East York Community Council: The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its committees and Boards.

    The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City's website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it – such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address – available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

    Many Committee Board, and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view. If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast. Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available.

     

    If you want to learn more about why and how the City collects your information, write to the City Clerk's Office, City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto, ON, M5H 2N2 or call 416-392-7033.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    • 46 Laing Street Toronto Ontario
    • 48 Laing Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate the Property - 63-65 Huntley Street (including entrance addresses at 1A-1B Selby Street)

    more

    TAKE NOTICE that Council for the City of Toronto intends to designate the property, including the lands, buildings and structures thereon known municipally as 63-65 Huntley Street (including entrance addresses at 1A-1B Selby Street) under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.O.18, as amended, as a property of cultural heritage value or interest.

     

    Reasons for Designation

     

    The properties at 63-65 Huntley Street are worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for their cultural heritage value, and meet Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under the criteria of design/physical, historical/associative, and contextual values.

     

    Description

    The subject properties at 63-65 Huntley Street are comprised of a pair of semi-detached, Victorian-era, Italianate-influenced, Bay and Gable Style homes. The pair primarily fronts onto Huntley Street with additional side frontage along Selby Street for 65 Huntley Street and its two rear additions (1A-1B Selby Street). The subject properties were built in 1877 by local builder and architect A.H. Rundle (who occupied 63 Huntley Street), and includes two later additions to the rear of 65 Huntley Street. These additions consist of a 1926 apartment addition/conversion overtop the original rear wing of the house (adding a second storey and side entrances), as well as a later, 1949-built, two-storey, detached garage with upper-floor apartment.

     

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    Design and Physical Value

    The subject properties at 63-65 Huntley Street hold significant design/physical value as a fine, representative pair of semi-detached, Victorian-era, Italianate-influenced, Bay and Gable style homes. The high degree of integrity shared by the pair is demonstrated by the many original details present along the principal (front) elevation. These details include: dichromatic masonry with a yellow-brick base layer accented with decorative red-brick courses and arches around doorways, window openings, roofline, and corner quoining, original wooden doorways/doors and window openings, and wooden soffit and fascia supported by wooden brackets and a common, centre gable with intricate bargeboard detailing.

     

    Historical and Associative Value

    The subject property at 63 Huntley Street holds significant historical/associative value as the home of local builder and architect Arkless Harris Rundle (1847-1909) who built this and several other properties within the Upper Jarvis neighbourhood. Rundle built and occupied the property between its construction in 1877 until his departure in 1884-1885. During this time, Arkless and his brother Charles bought up and developed several nearby lots, including a row of three contiguous homes at 7-11 Selby Street. Eventually, after having profited from the development the Upper Jarvis neighbourhood which he called home, A.H. Rundle commissioned a new, much grander home for he and his family at 15 Selby Street - the A.H. Rundle House (1888) by notable Toronto architect E.J. Lennox a testament to the enterprising Rundle brothers' success.

     

    Contextual Value

    The subject properties at 63-65 Huntley Street hold significant contextual value as they define, maintain, and support the character of the surrounding streetscape and are physically, functionally, visually, and historically linked to the development of the Upper Jarvis neighbourhood. The high degree of architectural integrity and materiality of the semi-detached home, connects the property contextually to its neighbours along Huntley Street, with its intricate masonry façade, delicate brickwork, and wooden bargeboard detailing forming a physical link to the nearby, contiguous row of Bay and Gable style homes at 47-59 Huntley Street which were all built in the same period.

     

    Heritage Attributes

    Design and Physical Value

    Attributes that contribute to the value of the properties at 63-65 Huntley Street as a fine example of Toronto's late nineteenth-century, Italianate-influenced, Bay and Gable typology include:

    • The symmetrical primary façade (front elevation) with its twin entryways, opposing pair of first-storey bay windows, and central gable
    • The dichromatic masonry façade with a yellow-brick base layer accented with decorative red-brick courses and arches around doorways, window openings, roofline, and corner quoining
    • The original wooden doorways/doors and window openings, and wooden soffit and fascia supported by wooden brackets and a common, centre gable with intricate bargeboard detailing
    • Historical or Associative Value
    • Historical connection to original architect and owner A.H. Rundle (1847-1909) who along with his brother Charles bought and developed several nearby plots in the area including 7-11 Selby Street
    • A.H Rundle occupied 63 Huntley Street between 1876-1877 and 1884-1886 before moving into two successive new homes designed by E.J. Lennox at 9 Selby Street then 15 Selby Street (1888)

     

    Contextual Value

    Attributes that contribute to the contextual value of the properties at 63-65 Huntley Street as defining, supporting, and maintaining the historic character of the area:

    • The high degree of architectural integrity and materiality of the semi-detached home, connects the property contextually to its neighbours along Huntley Street
    • The intricate masonry façade, delicate brickwork, and wooden bargeboard detailing forming a physical link to the nearby, contiguous row of Bay and Gable style homes at 47-59 Huntley Street which were all built in the same period

     

    N.B. The detached garage addition to the property at 65 Huntley Street known municipally as 1B Selby Street is not considered a heritage attribute.

     

    1 A Selby Street

    Reasons for Designation

     

    The property at 1A Selby Street is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under the criteria of design/physical and contextual values.

     

    Description

    Built overtop what was once a one-storey, light industrial structure attached to the rear of the main house, the 1926-built, Arts and Crafts style apartment conversion and addition is primarily confined to the second storey, albeit with a reconfigured side entrance which helps transition the addition to the original structure along the Selby Street elevation. The 1926-era, second-storey (and side entrance) portion of the apartment addition features stucco cladding with Tudor Revival half-timbering. The largely wooden, double side entrance is protected with a small portico roof with exposed rafter tails, which features two symmetrical pairs of wooden, intricately-composed, bracket-ended supports which frame each of the two identical doorways (one into 1A Selby Street, the other into the rear of 65 Huntley Street). Between these side doors stands an original, fixed, multi-light window pane.

     

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    Design and Physical Value

    The 1926-built, rear, two-storey apartment addition at the back of 65 Huntley Street holds design/physical value as a rare, unique example (within the area) of an Arts and Crafts-influenced piece of domestic architecture within what is predominantly a late nineteenth-century neighbourhood. Prominent design features include: the second floor apartment addition with stucco and Tudor Revival half-timbering and the ground-floor double side entrance with portico roof (supported by wooden brackets) with exposed rafter tails and a large, original, fixed-pane, multi-light window between the entryways. The ground floor is largely comprised of the original rear wing of the main house, and features many of the same masonry details: yellow-brick and corner quoining.

     

    Contextual Value

    An early twentieth-century addition to Upper Jarvis neighbourhood, 1A Selby is representative of the second major phase of development in the area, part of the same period of intensification which includes the 1910-built, three-storey apartment addition to the rear of 47 Huntley Street (2 Linden Street) and the construction of the adjacent, 1919-built, three-storey apartment next door at 8A Linden Street. The rear addition at 1A Selby also holds significant contextual value for its physical and functional connection to its surroundings - namely to 65 Huntley Street to which it is attached. Converted from a former malting house into an apartment, 1A Selby Street is indicative of a neighbourhood in transition.

     

    Heritage Attributes

    Design and Physical Value

    Attributes that contribute to the value of the property at 1A Selby Street as a fine example of an Arts and Crafts-influenced rear apartment addition include:

    • The scale and massing of the second-floor apartment addition/expansion which was created sympathetically atop the former light industrial rear addition to the home
    • The high degree of integrity present among the property's extant original materials and architectural details - brick masonry with corner quoining detail (ground floor), stucco and half-timbering (second floor), and Arts and Crafts-influenced double side entrance with multi-light window and intricate portico roof with exposed rafter tails and wooden support brackets

    Contextual Value

    Attributes that contribute to the contextual value of the property at 1A Selby Street as defining, supporting, and maintaining the historic character of the area:

    • The apartment conversion/expansion to the rear of 65 Huntley Street is contextually linked to the second major phase of intensification within the Upper Jarvis neighbourhood as evidenced by the 1910 apartment addition (2 Linden Street) at 47 Huntley Street and the adjacent 1919-built apartment block at 8A Linden Street

     

    Notice of Objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate

     

    Notice of an objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property may be served on the City Clerk, Attention: Administrator, Secretariat, City Clerk's Office, Toronto City Hall, 2nd Floor West, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2.; Email: hertpb@toronto.ca within thirty days of June 21, 2022, which is July 21, 2022. The notice of objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property must set out the reason(s) for the objection and all relevant facts.

     

    Getting Additional Information:

     

    Further information in respect of the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property is available from the City of Toronto at:

     

    http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2022.CC45.5

     

    • 63 Huntley Street Toronto Ontario
    • 64 Huntley Street Toronto Ontario
    • 65 Huntley Street Toronto Ontario
    • 1A Selby Street Toronto Ontario
    • 1B Selby Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate the Property - 1-3 Selby Street

    more

    TAKE NOTICE that Council for the City of Toronto intends to designate the property, including the lands, buildings and structures thereon known municipally as 1-3 Selby Street under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.O.18, as amended, as a property of cultural heritage value or interest.

     

    Reasons for Designation

    The properties at 1-3 Selby Street are worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for their cultural heritage value, and meet Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under the criteria of design/physical, historical/associative, and contextual values.

     

    Description

    The semi-detached house-form building at 1-3 Selby Street is comprised of a pair of 2-storey, brick dwellings constructed together in 1876. Situated on the south side of Selby Street, between Huntley Street and Sherbourne Street, the properties at 1-3 Selby Street help to define and support the character of this block within the historic Upper Jarvis neighbourhood. The pair dates to the earliest period of development in this area, and contributes to a streetscape largely consisting of late-nineteenth-century house-form buildings including row houses, semi-detached and detached properties. The buildings’ scale, form, massing, materials, and roofline are consistent with and complementary to their surroundings, particularly the Queen Anne Revival styling of the heritage property at 15 Selby Street and Rundle Row at 7-11 Selby Street with its combination of Queen Anne Revival and Second Empire styling.

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

     

    Design and Physical Value

    Constructed in 1876, the properties at 1-3 Selby Street are valued as fine representative examples of semi-detached Second Empire style residences. The red brick-clad properties have maintained a high degree of integrity as a pair and retain many intact features that are typical of Victorian architectural design. Their composition features the quintessential Mansard roof with dormer windows contained highly decorative woodwork detailing and a projecting bay of windows on each half of the pair at the first-storey level. Additional details of note include the decorative slate shingling of the roof, projecting cornice below the roofline supported by decorative wooden brackets, the segmental-arched main entrances with transoms and the iron cresting surmounting the projecting bay window at 3 Selby Street.

     

    Historical and Associative Value

    The semi-detached pair of residences at 1-3 Selby Street are valued for their association with Hancock & Townsend, a prominent architectural firm in Toronto which also designed the Equity Chambers, the first building in Toronto to incorporate passenger elevators.

     

    Contextual Value

    Situated on the south side of Selby Street, between Huntley Street and Sherbourne Street, the two semi-detached properties at 1-3 Linden Street help to define and support the character of this block within the historic Upper Jarvis neighbourhood. The buildings’ scale, form, massing, materials, and gabled roofline are consistent with and complementary to their surroundings, and their integrity as a pair with intact detailing lends them a degree of visual prominence in this context. The properties at 1-3 Selby Street are visually and historically linked to their surroundings. The pair dates to the earliest period of development in this area, and contributes to a streetscape largely consisting of late-nineteenth century house-form buildings.

     

    Heritage Attributes

     

    Design and Physical Value

    The following heritage attributes contribute to the cultural heritage value of the properties at 1-3 Selby Street as a representative example of a semi-detached pair of Second Empire style residences:

     

    • The properties’ siting and orientation on the south side of Selby Street
    • The properties’ scale, form, and massing as a 3-storey pair of semi-detached, Second Empire style house-form buildings
    • The material palette typical of Second Empire residential buildings, including primarily red brick with wood detailing and decorative slate shingling on the roof in a hexagonal pattern
    • The mansard roofline on the principal (north) and west elevation (1 Selby Street), defined by its steep slope, wooden dormer windows with their detailed millwork and cornice line below surmounted by decorative wooden brackets
    • Bay window projection on the first floor of the principal (north) elevation with its segmental-arched window openings, decorative brickwork including dogtooth brickwork below the continuous sills and cresting atop the bay window roof at 3 Selby Street
    • Segmental-arched door opening on principal (north) elevation, including brick keystone at 1 Selby Street

     

    Contextual Value

    The following heritage attributes contribute to the cultural heritage value of the properties at 1-3 Selby Street as character-defining structures within a historic residential streetscape:

     

    • The properties’ siting and orientation on the south side of Selby Street
    • The properties’ scale, form, and massing as a 3-storey pair of semi-detached, Second Empire style house-form buildings
    • The material palette typical of Second Empire residential buildings, including primarily red brick with wood detailing and decorative slate shingling on the roof
    • The mansard roofline defined by a steep slope and dormer windows, characteristic of a Victorian-era streetscape

     

    Notice of Objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate

     

    Notice of an objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property may be served on the City Clerk, Attention: Administrator, Secretariat, City Clerk's Office, Toronto City Hall, 2nd Floor West, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2.; Email: hertpb@toronto.ca within thirty days of June 21, 2022, which is July 21, 2022. The notice of objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property must set out the reason(s) for the objection and all relevant facts.

     

    Getting Additional Information:

     

    Further information in respect of the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property is available from the City of Toronto at:

     

    http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2022.CC45.5 

     

    • 1 Selby Street Toronto Ontario
    • 3 Selby Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate the Property - 7-11 Selby Street

    more

    TAKE NOTICE that Council for the City of Toronto intends to designate the property, including the lands, buildings and structures thereon known municipally as 7-11 Selby Street under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.O.18, as amended, as a property of cultural heritage value or interest.

     

    RUNDLE ROW

    Reasons for Designation

     

    The properties at 7-11 Selby Street are worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for their cultural heritage value, and meet Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under the criteria of design/physical, historical/associative, and contextual value.

     

    Description

    Rundle Row at 7-11 Selby Street is comprised of three, 2-storey, brick residential row houses constructed together in 1880. Situated on the south side of Selby Street, between Huntley Street and Sherbourne Street, the properties at 7-11 Selby Street help to define and support the character of this block within the historic Upper Jarvis neighbourhood. The row dates to the earliest period of development in this area, and contributes to a streetscape largely consisting of late-nineteenth-century house-form buildings including row houses, semi-detached, and detached properties. The buildings’ scale, form, massing, materials, and varied roofline are consistent with and complementary to their surroundings, particularly the Queen Anne Revival styling of the heritage property directly east at 15 Selby Street and the Second Empire features directly west at 1-3 Selby Street. Of the eight late-nineteenth century residential buildings fronting onto the south side of Selby Street, four were designed by the firm of McCaw & Lennox (1876-1881), which included eminent Toronto architect, E.J. Lennox, and owned/built by one of the architecture firm's seemingly favoured contractors, Arkless H. Rundle. These include the heritage property at 15 Selby Street (A.H. Rundle House, 1888) and the subject properties at 7-11 Selby Street identified in this report as Rundle Row (1880). The small scale and compact nature of the row house typology at 7-11 Selby Street represents an interesting example of residential design by Lennox that departs from his more typical, large-scale, single-family detached dwellings.

     

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

     

    Design and Physical Value

    The properties at 7-11 Selby Street constitute a well-crafted and rare example of a late-nineteenth century residential row designed in the popular Queen Anne Revival style with Second Empire influences. They are particularly distinguished by the combination of a dichromatic slate mansard roofline with dormer windows broken with asymmetrically-arranged gables containing pebbledash infill or wood shingling. Alterations to the principal (north) elevations, including the wooden cladding at 7 and 9 Selby Street, and the east addition to 11 Selby Street with its excavated below-grade garage, adds to the eclectic and evolved design landscape of the street.

     

    Historical and Associative Value

    The row of three properties at 7-11 Selby Street are valued for their association with Arkless H. Rundle, a builder and land speculator who owned 7, 9, and 15 Selby Street as well as a number of lots on the north side of Selby Street. A.H. Rundle owned and occupied 9 Selby while his brother, Charles Rundle, a leading contractor in Toronto who worked with architect E. J. Lennox on various architectural projects, owned and occupied the attached property at 11 Selby. The Rundles are reported to have built at least nineteen homes in the Upper Jarvis neighbourhood during the late nineteenth century.

     

    Rundle Row is also valued for its associations with the eminent Toronto architect E. J. Lennox who is attributed with the design along with his business partner at the time, William Frederick McCaw. While Lennox is best known for local landmarks such as Toronto City Hall (Old City Hall) and Casa Loma, he also received numerous commissions for residential buildings in Toronto's upscale neighbourhoods, including the Part IV Designated A. H. Rundle House (1888) located directly east of the subject properties.

     

    Contextual Value

    Situated on the south side of Selby Street, between Huntley Street and Sherbourne Street, the row of three attached dwellings at7-11 Selby Street help to define and support the character of this block within the historic Upper Jarvis neighbourhood. The buildings’ scale, form, massing, materials, and gabled roofline are consistent with and complementary to their surroundings, and their integrity as a pair with intact detailing lends them a degree of visual prominence in this context. The properties at 7-11 Selby Street are visually and historically linked to their surroundings. The set dates to the earliest period of development in this area, and contributes to a streetscape largely consisting of late-nineteenth century house-form buildings.

     

    Historical or Associative Value

    • Historical connection to original architect and owner A.H. Rundle (1847-1909) who along with his brother Charles bought and developed several nearby plots in the area including 7-11 Selby Street
    • A.H Rundle occupied 63 Huntley Street between 1876-1877 and 1884-1886 before moving into two successive new homes designed by E.J. Lennox at 9 Selby Street then 15 Selby Street (1888)

    Heritage Attributes

     

    Design and Physical Value

    Attributes that contribute to the value of the properties at 7-11 Selby Street as a rare example of a residential row typology combining Queen Anne Revival and Second Empire styling include:

     

    • The properties’ siting and orientation on the south side of Selby Street
    • The properties’ scale, form, and massing as a set of three, 2-storey house-form buildings
    • The material palette typical of Victorian Era buildings, including primarily red brick with stone and wood detailing, including buff brick detailing at 7 and 11 Selby 
    • The varied roofline defined by alternating and asymmetrical mansard roofs, gables and a pyramidal roof at 9 Selby
    • Roof dormers on the principal (north) elevation with their wooden millwork and matching roofs
    • At 7 and 11 Selby, the triangular arch window opening in splayed brick face with dichromatic brick above
    • Box gable on the principal (north) elevation of all three properties with wood brackets and bargeboard; decorative half-timbering with masonry chip nogging on the north elevation and east return at 11 Selby
    • At 11 Selby, the projecting wood-framed vestibule with millwork detail, main entrance with decorative transom and a flat roof

    Contextual Value

    The following heritage attributes contribute to the cultural heritage value of the properties at 7-11 Selby Street as character-defining structures within a historic residential streetscape:

     

    • The properties’ siting and orientation on the south side of Selby Street
    • The properties’ scale, form, and massing as a set of three, 2-storey house-form buildings
    • The material palette typical of Victorian Era buildings, including primarily red brick with stone and wood detailing, including buff brick detailing at 7 and 11 Selby 
    • The varied roofline defined by alternating and asymmetrical mansard roofs, box gables and a pyramidal roof at 9 Selby

    Notice of Objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate

     

    Notice of an objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property may be served on the City Clerk, Attention: Administrator, Secretariat, City Clerk's Office, Toronto City Hall, 2nd Floor West, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2.; Email: hertpb@toronto.ca within thirty days of June 21, 2022, which is July 21, 2022. The notice of objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property must set out the reason(s) for the objection and all relevant facts.

     

    Getting Additional Information:

     

    Further information in respect of the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property is available from the City of Toronto at:

     

    http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2022.CC45.5 

    • 7 Selby Street Toronto Ontario
    • 11 Selby Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate the Property - 49-59 Huntley Street

    more

    TAKE NOTICE that Council for the City of Toronto intends to designate the property, including the lands, buildings and structures thereon known municipally as 49-59 Huntley Street under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.O.18, as amended, as a property of cultural heritage value or interest.

     

    This notice is being served to the Owner of the Property, the Ontario Heritage Trust, and any Objectors and Interested Persons.

     

    Reasons for Designation

     

    The properties at 49-59 Huntley Street are worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for their cultural heritage value, and meet Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under the criteria of design/physical and contextual values.

     

    Description

     

    The properties at 49-59 Huntley Street form part of a contiguous row of five near-identical, Victorian-era, Bay and Gable style, 2 1/2-storey homes (47-55 Huntley Street) attached to a slightly larger pair of near-identical, Victorian-era, Bay and Gable style, 2 1/2-storey homes (57-59 Huntley Street) - totalling a complete row of seven homes. All of the homes feature brick facades with brick detailing, wooden double-hung sash windows, transom windows, and decorative wooden gables with bargeboard detailing. Five of the seven homes within the row are configured as half bay and gables, as indicated by their one-storey bay windows paired with steep rooflines and decorative wooden gables - leaving a pair of taller, full bay and gable homes at the north end of the row. Some of the homes feature wrought iron dwarf parapets above their half bays. Considered as a row, the collection of homes date to the mid-1870s, and are among the earliest structures within the Upper Jarvis neighbourhood.

     

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    Design and Physical Value

     

    The subject properties at 49-59 Huntley Street share considerable design value as part of a discreet, representative, collection of Victorian-era, half Bay and Gable style townhouses holding a significant degree of architectural integrity. The materiality and craftsmanship evident in the delicate brickwork (featuring raised courses of brick headers outlining architectural elements), and the mix of hand-carved and machine-turned millwork upon the wooden gables and bargeboard detailing, are all representative of a high degree of design and skilled execution.

     

    Contextual Value

     

    Contextually, the subject properties at 49-59 Huntley Street hold significant cultural heritage value as they collectively support and maintain the architectural character of the historic Upper Jarvis neighbourhood. Built 1874-1876, the subject properties are among the oldest surviving house-form structures in the vicinity, and together tell the story of the area's residential development during the late nineteenth century. Originally occupied by middle-class lawyers, bankers, civil engineers, and business owners, the subject properties are representative of the early demographic makeup of this fashionable corner of Victorian-era Toronto.

     

    Heritage Attributes

    Design and Physical Value

     

    Attributes that contribute to the value of the properties at 49-59 Huntley Street as a fine example of Toronto's late nineteenth-century Bay and Gable typology include:

    • The scale, massing, and uniformity of the contiguous row of five townhouses and two semi-detached homes as defined by the subject properties
    • The high degree of integrity present among the properties' extant original materials and architectural details - brick masonry, wooden gables and bargeboards, punched transom and double-hung sash windows, wrought iron dwarf parapets
    • The use of decorative, raised, courses of brick used to trace architectural details such as the tops of windows; the use of brick arches overtop windows and doors
    • The distinctive half Bay and Gable configuration of the row at 49-55 Huntley Street
    • The prominent bargeboard detail of the semi-detached pair at 57-59 Huntley Street

     

    Contextual Value

     

    Attributes that contribute to the contextual value of the properties at 49-59 Huntley Street as defining, supporting, and maintaining the historic character of the area:

    • The consistency of typology, form, and function shared by the contiguous row of subject properties which creates a discreet collection of late nineteenth-century Bay and Gable homes along the east side of Huntley Street
    • The reliance upon, and skilled use of, traditional materials including yellow brick, decorative woodwork, and wrought iron detailing, which support the late nineteenth-century character of the Upper Jarvis neighbourhood

     

    Notice of Objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate

     

    Notice of an objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property may be served on the City Clerk, Attention: Administrator, Secretariat, City Clerk's Office, Toronto City Hall, 2nd Floor West, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2.; Email: hertpb@toronto.ca within thirty days of June 21, 2022, which is July 21, 2022. The notice of objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property must set out the reason(s) for the objection and all relevant facts.

     

     

    Getting Additional Information:

     

    Further information in respect of the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property is available from the City of Toronto at:

     

    http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2022.CC45.5

     

    • 49 Huntley Street Toronto Ontario
    • 59 Huntley Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of proposal to name a Private Street at 100 Queens Quay East - John M Tinsley Street

    more

    To consider a proposal to name a private street at 100 Queens Quay East, as "John M Tinsley Street".

                                                                   

    At its meeting to be held in Council Chamber, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, on June 29, 2022, at 9:30 a.m., or shortly afterwards, the Toronto and East York Community Council will hear in person or by his or her counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who claims that his or her lands will be prejudicially affected by the naming and who applies to be heard with respect to the proposed naming.

     

    To obtain additional information, submit comments or to address the Toronto and East York Community Council meeting on June 29, 2022, please contact the following City official no later than 12:00 p.m. on June 28, 2022.

     

                Ellen Devlin

                Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council

                City Clerk’s Office

                Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West

                2nd floor, West Tower

                Toronto, Ontario M5H 2N2

                Telephone: 416-392-7033; Fax: 416-397-0111

                E-mail: teycc@toronto.ca

     

    Special Assistance for Members of the Public:  City staff can arrange for special assistance with some advance notice. If you need special assistance, please call 416-392-7033, TTY 416-338-0889 or e-mail teycc@toronto.ca.

     

    Notice to People Writing or Making Presentations to the Toronto and East York Community Council: The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its Committees and Boards. The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City’s website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it - such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address - available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

     

    Many Committee, Board, and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view. If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast. Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available.

     

    • 100 Queens Quay East Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate the Property - 47 Huntley Street (including entrance address at 2 Linden Street)

    more

    TAKE NOTICE that Council for the City of Toronto intends to designate the property, including the lands, buildings and structures thereon known municipally as 47 Huntley Street (including entrance address at 2 Linden Street) under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.O.18, as amended, as a property of cultural heritage value or interest.

     

    Reasons for Designation

     

    The property at 47 Huntley Street, as the end/corner unit of a contiguous row of similar properties at 47-59 Huntley Street, is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under the criteria of design/physical and contextual values.

     

    Description

     

    The property at 47 Huntley Street is the end/corner unit of a contiguous row of five near-identical, Victorian-era, Bay and Gable style, 2 1/2-storey homes (47-55 Huntley Street) attached to a slightly larger pair of near-identical, Victorian-era, Bay and Gable style, 2 1/2-storey homes (57-59 Huntley Street) - totalling a complete row of seven homes. All of the homes feature brick facades with brick detailing, wooden double-hung sash windows, transom windows, and decorative wooden gables with bargeboard detailing. The homes within the row are configured as half bay and gables, as indicated by their one-storey bay windows paired with steep rooflines and decorative wooden gables. Some of the homes feature wrought iron dwarf parapets above their half bays. Considered as a row, the collection of homes date to the mid-1870s, and are among the earliest structures within the Upper Jarvis neighbourhood.

     

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    Design and Physical Value

     

    The subject property, as part of the aforementioned contiguous row at 47-59 Huntley Street holds considerable design value as a discreet, representative, part of a collection of Victorian-era, half Bay and Gable style townhouses retaining a significant degree of architectural integrity. The materiality and craftsmanship evident in the delicate brickwork (featuring raised courses of brick headers outlining architectural elements), and the mix of hand-carved and machine-turned millwork upon the wooden gables and bargeboard detailing, are all representative of a high degree of design and skilled execution.

     

    Contextual Value

     

    Contextually, the subject property at 47 Huntley Street, as part of the aforementioned contiguous row at 47-59 Huntley Street, holds significant cultural heritage value as it supports and maintains the architectural character of the historic Upper Jarvis neighbourhood. Built 1877, the subject property is among the oldest surviving house-form structures in the vicinity, and tells the story of the area's residential development during the late nineteenth century. Originally occupied by a middle-class lawyers, bankers, civil engineers, and business owners, this and the larger row of subject properties are representative of the early demographic makeup of this once fashionable corner of the Old City of Toronto.

     

    Heritage Attributes

    Design and Physical Value

    Attributes that contribute to the value of the property at 47 Huntley Street as a fine example of Toronto's late nineteenth-century Bay and Gable typology include:

    • The scale, massing, and uniformity of the property as part of a contiguous row of five townhouses and two semi-detached homes as defined by the subject properties
    • The high degree of integrity present among the property's extant original materials and architectural details - brick masonry, wooden gables and bargeboards, punched transom and double-hung sash windows, wrought iron dwarf parapets
    • The use of decorative, raised, courses of brick used to trace architectural details such as the tops of windows; the use of brick arches overtop windows and doors
    • The distinctive half Bay and Gable configuration of this property and that of the row at 47-55 Huntley Street

     

    Contextual Value

    Attributes that contribute to the contextual value of the property at 47 Huntley Street as defining, supporting, and maintaining the historic character of the area:

    • The consistency of typology, form, and function shared by the property as part of a contiguous row of subject properties which creates a discreet collection of late nineteenth-century Bay and Gable homes along the east side of Huntley Street
    • The reliance upon, and skilled use of, traditional materials including yellow brick, decorative woodwork, and wrought iron detailing, which support the late nineteenth-century character of the Upper Jarvis neighbourhood

     

     

    2 Linden Street

    Reasons for Designation

     

    The property at 2 Linden Street is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under the criteria of design/physical and contextual values.

     

    Description

     

    The three-storey, apartment block addition attached to the rear of 47 Huntley Street, known municipally as an active entrance at 2 Linden Street, was built in 1910 in the Edwardian Classicism style then broadly popular across Toronto and elsewhere. The principal (south) elevation facing onto Linden Street features a central entryway with an arched overhang roof, overtop of which a six-light window with decorative stained glass brings light into the main interior staircase. The six-unit apartment block is flanked by small balconies attached to the western and eastern elevations, which double as fire escapes. The horizontal roofline is supported by a decorative cornice which has been capped in tin or aluminium. Built in 1910, the apartment block addition speaks to a period in Toronto's early twentieth-century urban densification and growth which led to the 1912 municipal ban on the construction of purpose-built apartment blocks.

     

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    Design and Physical Value

     

    The expressive use of symmetry along the principal (south) elevation facing onto Linden Street - the central entryway, flanking window bays, and bookending balconies - are representative of the Edwardian Classicism style of the period. Further architectural details - the elliptical arch roof over the entryway (with decorative cornice detailing), the six-light stained glass window above, and the cornice detail along the roofline - highlight the extent of extant original details which retain a significant level of integrity. Lastly, the decorative brick masonry details, including the raised courses along the second and third stories, and the quoining detail at the eastern and western terminus' of the principal elevation, demonstrate the skill with which the façade was designed and built.

     

    Contextual Value

     

    Contextually, the subject property at 2 Linden Street has significant cultural heritage value as a representative example of an early walk-up apartment block building within the heart of what was originally a late-nineteenth-century streetscape defined by a mix of stately mansions and middle-class single-family homes. Similar to its immediate neighbour at 8A Linden Street, and to several other similar vintage apartment additions and standalone apartment block buildings in the vicinity, 2 Linden Street holds contextual value as an important part of the evolution of the Upper Jarvis neighbourhood and of the Old City of Toronto generally. 

     

    Heritage Attributes

    Design and Physical Value

    Attributes that contribute to the value of the property at 2 Linden Street as a fine example of Toronto's early twentieth-century walk-up apartment typology include:

    • The scale, massing, and symmetry of the three-storey apartment addition which position the structure as a representative example of the Edwardian Classicism style
    • The high degree of integrity present among the property's extant original materials and architectural details - brick masonry with raised courses and quoining detail, stained glass windows, elliptical, corniced, archway feature over main entryway, roofline with cornice and deep soffit, wood-framed windows, open-air balconies
    • The use of decorative, raised, courses of brick used to trace architectural details on the second and third storeys, and the quoining detail work; the elliptical arch roof over the main entryway; the six-light stained glass window; the roofline cornice

    Contextual Value

    Attributes that contribute to the contextual value of the property at 2 Linden Street as defining, supporting, and maintaining the historic character of the area:

    • The massing, form, and function, of the Edwardian Classicism style walk-up apartment addition supportive of the historic, architectural character of the Upper Jarvis neighbourhood's second major phase of development
    • The reliance upon, and skilled use of, traditional materials including brick, stained glass, and cornice detailing which support the early twentieth-century character of the Upper Jarvis neighbourhood

     

     

    Notice of Objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate

     

    Notice of an objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property may be served on the City Clerk, Attention: Administrator, Secretariat, City Clerk's Office, Toronto City Hall, 2nd Floor West, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2.; Email: hertpb@toronto.ca within thirty days of June 21, 2022, which is July 21, 2022. The notice of objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property must set out the reason(s) for the objection and all relevant facts.

     

    Getting Additional Information:

     

    Further information in respect of the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property is available from the City of Toronto at:

     

    http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2022.CC45.5

     

    • 2 Linden Street Toronto Ontario
    • 47 Huntley Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate the Property - 16-18 Linden Street

    more

    TAKE NOTICE that Council for the City of Toronto intends to designate the property, including the lands, buildings and structures thereon known municipally as 16-18 Linden Street under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.O.18, as amended, as a property of cultural heritage value or interest.

     

    Reasons for Designation

     

    The properties at 16-18 Linden Street are worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for their cultural heritage value, and meet Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation, under the categories of design/physical and contextual value.

     

    Description

    The properties at 16-18 Linden Street, dating to 1876, comprise a semi-detached pair of two-and-a-half-storey house-form buildings on the north side of Linden Street, between Huntley Street and Sherbourne Street. The pair represents the Bay and Gable typology and retains many intact features of Victorian architectural design. The buildings share a cross-gabled roof with two front gables; they are configured with a gable and a one-storey bay window on the west side of each half, and an entrance on each portion’s east side. The front gables include decorative wood bargeboards with pierced details. On their primarily red-brick exteriors, the buildings demonstrate dichromatic brickwork, including a four-course buff-brick band above the stone foundation, single-course buff-brick banding at the upper storeys, and buff brick highlights above each window. Although the windows have been replaced, the buildings appear to retain their original fenestration patterns and segmentally arched openings. The raised entries constitute the primary distinction between the two buildings. At 16 Linden Street (the western half), the front door is slightly recessed within a wood portico, including four columns, a spindlework frieze, and fluted brackets. At 18 Linden Street (the eastern half), the front door is flush within an entryway that is entirely enclosed by brick, with a segmental arch and dichromatic brick details above a transom. Seeming to reflect a change in grade, another difference lies in the larger raised basement window visible within the projecting bay at 16 Linden Street. The properties have largely maintained their integrity as a pair.

     

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    Constructed in 1876, the properties at 16 and 18 Linden Street constitute representative examples of semi-detached Bay and Gable residences. The properties have maintained a high degree of integrity as a pair and retain many intact features that are typical of Victorian architectural design. Their composition features the quintessential combination of a front gable over a projecting bay of windows on each half of the pair. With red-brick exteriors featuring buff-brick trim, the properties demonstrate dichromatic brickwork, which grew popular as a design feature in Ontario during the 1870s and 1880s. Additional details of note include segmentally arched openings, decorative wood bargeboards with pierced details in the front gables, and, at 16 Linden Street, a wood portico with four columns, a spindlework frieze, and fluted brackets.

     

    Situated on the north side of Linden Street, between Huntley Street and Sherbourne Street, the properties at 16-18 Linden Street help to define and support the character of this block within the historic Upper Jarvis neighbourhood. The buildings’ scale, form, massing, materials, and gabled roofline are consistent with and complementary to their surroundings, and their integrity as a pair with intact detailing lends them a degree of visual prominence in this context. The properties at 16-18 Linden Street are visually and historically linked to their surroundings. The pair dates to the earliest period of development in this area, and contributes to a streetscape largely consisting of late-nineteenth century house-form buildings.

     

    Heritage Attributes

    Design and Physical Value

    The following heritage attributes contribute to the cultural heritage value of the properties at 16-18 Linden Street as a representative example of a semi-detached pair of Bay and Gable residences.

    • The properties’ scale, form, and massing as a two-and-a-half-storey pair of semi-detached, Bay and Gable house-form buildings
    • The material palette typical of Victorian Bay-and-Gable buildings, including primarily red brick with buff brick and wood detailing 
    • The roofline defined by the buildings’ two front gables, characteristic of a Victorian-era streetscape
    • The dichromatic brickwork on both buildings, including a four-course buff-brick band at the base, single-course buff-brick banding at the upper storeys, and buff brick highlights above each window
    • Wood embellishment, including decorative wood bargeboards with pierced details in the two front gables, and the wood portico at 16 Linden Street, featuring four columns, a spindlework frieze, and fluted brackets
    • The fenestration pattern and segmentally arched openings on the primary (south) elevation of both buildings
    • The composition of each half of the pair, with a one-storey projecting bay and front gable at the west side of each portion, and an entrance on each portion’s east side

     

    Contextual Value

    The following heritage attributes contribute to the cultural heritage value of the properties at 16-18 Linden Street as character-defining structures within a historic residential streetscape.

    • The properties’ siting and orientation on the north side of Linden Street
    • The properties’ scale, form, and massing as a two-and-a-half-storey pair of semi-detached, Bay-and-Gable house-form buildings
    • The material palette typical of Victorian Bay-and-Gable buildings, including primarily red brick with buff brick and wood detailing 
    • The roofline defined by the buildings’ two front gables, characteristic of a Victorian-era streetscape

    Notice of Objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate

     

    Notice of an objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property may be served on the City Clerk, Attention: Administrator, Secretariat, City Clerk's Office, Toronto City Hall, 2nd Floor West, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2.; Email: hertpb@toronto.ca within thirty days of June 21, 2022, which is July 21, 2022. The notice of objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property must set out the reason(s) for the objection and all relevant facts.

     

    Getting Additional Information:

     

    Further information in respect of the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property is available from the City of Toronto at:

     

    http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2022.CC45.5

     

    • 16 Linden Street Toronto Ontario
    • 18 Linden Street Toronto Ontario

    Proposal to Pass a By-law to Permanently Close Portions of Public Highway Lands known as Borough Drive

    more

    CITY OF TORONTO ACT, 2006, PUBLIC NOTICE

    Scarborough Community Council Area

     

    The Council of the City of Toronto proposes to pass a by-law to permanently close portions of public highway lands known as Borough Drive, described as follows:

    Part of PIN 06000-0208(LT)

    Part of Parcel Streets-1 and Parcel 1 Foot Reserve-1, Section M1410. Borough Drive, Described as Borough Drive, Plan 66-M1410; Part of Block PX (1 Foot Reserve), Plan 66-M1410 being Part 1 on Reference Plan 66R-9462; Part of Blocks RX and QX (1 Foot Reserve), Plan 66M-1410 being Parts 1 and 2 on Reference Plan 66R-7220; Part of Block KX (1 Foot Reserve), Plan 66M-1410 being Part 1 on Reference Plan 66R-7221, subject to a Right of Way over Blocks KX, PX, QX, RX as in Instrument Nos. A322822 & A322040. Scarborough, City of Toronto; designated as Part 13 on the Draft Reference Plan, dated May 11, 2022, prepared by Schaeffer Dzaldov Bennett Ltd, as attached to the staff report, Toronto, City of Toronto.

     

    At its meeting to be held on June 30, 2022 at 9:30 a.m., or shortly afterwards, the Scarborough Community Council will hear in person or by his or her counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who wishes to speak to this matter.

    The meeting of the Scarborough Community Council will be held with members participating in person and remotely, and the proceedings of the Scarborough Community Council will be conducted publicly.

     

    To view a copy of the proposed by-law and plan to close the portion of public highway lands known as Borough Drive, obtain additional information, submit comments or address the Scarborough Community Council meeting on June 30, 2022, please contact the following City official no later than 12:00 p.m. on June 29, 2022.

    Julie Amoroso, Administrator

    Scarborough Community Council

    City Hall

    2nd Floor, West Tower

    Toronto, Ontario. M5H 2N2

    Telephone:  416-396-7287; Facsimile: 416-392-2980

    E-mail: scc@toronto.ca

    Notice to people writing or making a presentation to the Scarborough Community Council: The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its committees.

    The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City’s website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it – such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address – available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

    The City videotapes committee and community council meetings. If you make a presentation to a committee or community council, the City will be videotaping you and City staff may make the video tapes available to the public.

    If you want to learn more about why and how the City collects your information, write to the City Clerk's Office, City Hall, 2nd Floor, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2.

    This notice shall also constitute notice to the public of the proposed public highway closure in accordance with the requirements of the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment for Schedule A+ activities.

    • Triton Road & Borough Drive Toronto Ontario
    • Progress Avenue & Borough Drive Toronto Ontario

    Proposal to Name a Proposed Private Lane - Liben Way

    more

    CITY OF TORONTO ACT, 2006 - PUBLIC NOTICE

    SCARBOROUGH COMMUNITY COUNCIL AREA

     

    To consider a proposal to name the proposed private lane at 165 Tapscott Road as "Liben Way".

    At its meeting to be held on June 30, 2022 at 9:30 a.m., or shortly afterwards, the Scarborough Community Council will hear from, or by his or her counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who claims that his or her lands will be prejudicially affected by the naming and who applies to be heard with respect to the proposed naming. 

    The meeting of the Scarborough Community Council will be held with members participating in person and remotely, and the proceedings of the Scarborough Community Council will be conducted publicly.

     

    Notice to People writing or making presentations to the Scarborough Community Council:  The personal information contained in your correspondence to Toronto City Council or its committees is collected under the City of Toronto Act, 2006, and the City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 27 – Council Procedures, section 27-21. Any personal information will become part of the public record and may be posted on the City's website, unless you expressly request the removal of personal identity information. Questions about the collection of this information may be directed to the City Clerk's office at 416-396-7287.

    The City videotapes committee and community council meetings. If you make a presentation to a committee or community council, the City will be videotaping you and City staff may make the video tapes available to the public.

    To obtain additional information, submit comments or address the Scarborough Community Council meeting on June 30, 2022, please contact the following City official no later than 12:00 p.m. on June 29, 2022.

    Ms. Julie Amoroso

    Administrator, Scarborough Community Council

    City Clerk’s Office

    Scarborough Civic Centre

    150 Borough Drive

    Toronto, Ontario M1P 4N7

    Telephone: 416-396-7287; Fax: 416-392-2980

    E-mail: scc@toronto.ca

    • 165 Tapscott Road Toronto Ontario

    Public Notice - Etobicoke York Community Council Area - 127 King Street

    more

    The Council of the City of Toronto proposes to pass a by-law to permanently close part of an untraveled public lane described as Part of PIN 10328-0306 (LT); Part of Lane on Registered Plan 182, City of Toronto and designated as Part 2 on Reference Plan 66R-32634.

     

    At its meeting to be held in the Council Chamber, Etobicoke Civic Centre, 399 The West Mall on June 27, 2022 at 9:30 a.m., or shortly afterwards, the Etobicoke York Community Council will hear from, or by their counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who wishes to speak to this matter.

     

    The meeting of the Etobicoke York Community Council will be held with members participating in person and remotely, and the proceedings of the Etobicoke York Community Council will be conducted publicly.

     

    To obtain additional information, including to view a copy of the proposed by-law and plan to close part of the untraveled public lane behind 127 King Street please review Item EY33.32 on the Community Council's agenda at http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/decisionBodyProfile.do?function=doPrepare&decisionBodyId=1922#Meeting-2022.EY33.

     

    To submit comments or address the Etobicoke York Community Council meeting on June 27, 2022 either in-person or by video conference or by phone, please contact the City Clerk's Office no later than 12:00 p.m. on June 24, 2022:

     

     

    Administrator, Etobicoke York Community Council

    City Clerk's Office

    Telephone: 416-394-8101; Fax: 416-392-2980

    E-mail: etcc@toronto.ca

     

    Mail: Etobicoke York Community Council

    c/o Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd Floor

    Toronto, Ontario M5H 2N2

     

    Special Assistance for Members of the Public:  City staff can arrange for special assistance with some advance notice. If you need special assistance, please call 416-394-8101, TTY 416-338-0889 or e-mail etcc@toronto.ca.

     

    Notice to people writing or making presentations to the Etobicoke York Community Council: The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its committees. The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City’s website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it – such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address – available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

     

    Many Committee, Board, and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view.  If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast.  Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available.

     

    This notice shall also constitute notice to the public of the proposed public highway closure in accordance with the requirements of the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment for Schedule A+ activities.

     

    • 127 King Street Toronto Ontario

    Public Notice - Etobicoke York Community Council Area - Murray Ross Parkway

    more

    The Council of the City of Toronto proposes to pass a by-law to permanently close part of an untraveled portion of Murray Ross Parkway described as Part of PIN 10245-0050 (LT), being that part of Part of Lots 22-25 Con 4 W.Y.S Township of York as in NY549377, Pt 1 64R-10786; being Murray Ross Parkway (Formerly Columbia Road) between Steeles Ave W and Keele St., Toronto (N York), City of Toronto, designated as Part 2 on Reference Plan 66R-31319.

     

    At its meeting to be held in the Council Chamber, Etobicoke Civic Centre, 399 The West Mall on June 27, 2022 at 9:30 a.m., or shortly afterwards, the Etobicoke York Community Council will hear from, or by their counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who wishes to speak to this matter.

     

    The meeting of the Etobicoke York Community Council will be held with members participating in person and remotely, and the proceedings of the Etobicoke York Community Council will be conducted publicly.

     

    To obtain additional information, including to view a copy of the proposed by-law and plan to close part of an untraveled portion Murray Ross Parkway please review Item EY33.31 on the Community Council's agenda at http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/decisionBodyProfile.do?function=doPrepare&decisionBodyId=1922#Meeting-2022.EY33.

     

    To submit comments or address the Etobicoke York Community Council meeting on June 27, 2022 either in-person or by video conference or by phone, please contact the City Clerk's Office no later than 12:00 p.m. on June 24, 2022:

     

     

    Administrator, Etobicoke York Community Council

    City Clerk's Office

    Telephone: 416-394-8101; Fax: 416-392-2980

    E-mail: etcc@toronto.ca

     

    Mail: Etobicoke York Community Council

    c/o Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd Floor

    Toronto, Ontario M5H 2N2

     

    Special Assistance for Members of the Public:  City staff can arrange for special assistance with some advance notice. If you need special assistance, please call 416-394-8101, TTY 416-338-0889 or e-mail etcc@toronto.ca.

     

    Notice to people writing or making presentations to the Etobicoke York Community Council: The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its committees. The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City’s website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it – such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address – available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

     

    Many Committee, Board, and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view.  If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast.  Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available.

     

    This notice shall also constitute notice to the public of the proposed public highway closure in accordance with the requirements of the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment for Schedule A+ activities.

     

    • Keele Street & Steeles Avenue West Toronto Ontario