Public Notice

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The City gives notice to the public on a variety of different matters, such as fees and charges, heritage designations, renaming of roads, and sale of property.

The City also gives notice through the newspaper, mail, or personal service, depending on legislation.

Current notices are listed below by date of posting. You can search for a current notice by word, phrase, topic, municipal ward, and/or date. You can also search past notices and access open data by clicking Search & Open Data.

Current Notices

Current Notices

    Total Records Found: 3

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    This extract of Notices is published for reference convenience. Only those Notices that have an address or location focus are listed. Please refer to the list of notices for complete list of current or archived notices.

    Mapped Notices

    Notice of Intention to Designate - 1 Weatherell Street

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    TAKE NOTICE that Council for the City of Toronto intends to designate the property, including the lands, buildings and structures thereon known municipally as 1 Weatherell Street under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.O.18, as amended, as a property of cultural heritage value or interest.

     

    Reasons for Designation

    The property at 1 Weatherell Street is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design/physical, historical/associative and contextual value.

     

    Description

    Anchoring the southwest corner of Weatherell Street and Armadale Avenue within the Bloor West Village neighbourhood, the property at 1 Weatherell contains a one-storey bungalow completed in 1923. Designed by the prolific Toronto-born architect, Henry Simpson (1865-1926), the Craftsman-style dwelling served as Simpson's private home in the final years of his life. Simpson's previous private residence designed by the architect himself and located at 7 Triller Avenue (1912) also employs the Craftsman style and has been recognized on the City's Heritage Register since 1980.

     

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    Physical and Design Value

    The property at 1 Weatherell Street is valued as a representative example of the bungalow building type, clad in red brick and designed by the architect-owner, Henry Simpson, in the Craftsman style. It contains defining features of the style including a mid-pitched gable roof with half-timbering, an asymmetrical design with its covered and arched main entrance porch opening onto the south and east elevations, wooden brackets and exposed wooden rafters below the eaves, leaded glass windows and flared, buttress-like corner columns on the south elevation.

     

    Historical and Associative Value

    The property is valued for its association with Toronto-born architect, Henry Simpson (1865-1926), who was a significant designer in Toronto through the late 19th and early 20th century, designing countless buildings for institutional, corporate and private clients. Trained under E.J. Lennox and having brief partnerships with Charles J. Gibson, James Ellis and Robert M. Young, he was primarily a sole practitioner. Notable works by Simpson during his career include Cooke's Church (1891, demolished) where he was an avid member and the Metallic Roofing Company factory and Beaux-Arts style showroom (1896), the latter having been designated a National Historic Site in 1985 and moved from its original location at King and Dufferin Streets to Atlantic Avenue the following year. 

     

    The property at 1 Weatherell was built at the end of Simpson's career as a practicing architect and is believed to have been designed for his personal use in retirement, likely reflected in the size and accessibility of the house and layout. His enjoyment of the house was short lived as he died at 62 years, three years after the house was built.

     

    The property also yields information that contributes to the understanding of the historical development and suburban expansion of Toronto and the residential and commercial growth along Bloor Street West in the early 20th century, as part of the wave of development that occurred following the annexation of The Junction to the City of Toronto in 1909. The inclusion of an attached garage in the design of the subject property signals the suburban context and emerging automobile culture that would come to define the Bloor West Village area by the mid-20th century.

     

    Contextual Value

    The Henry Simpson House defines, maintains, and supports the early-20th century residential character in the western portion of Bloor West Village, north of Bloor Street West. The property's early-20th century date of construction is consistent with the neighbourhood while also defining itself as a unique, architect-owned and designed dwelling situated on a corner lot amongst more typical and uniformly-designed subdivision houses.

     

    The property is physically, functionally, visually and historically linked to its surroundings in the residential area of Bloor West Village just northwest of the Jane and Bloor intersection where its Craftsman-style design and detailing at once references and sets it apart from the other 1920s houses, as well as townhouses and institutional buildings of later periods on the street. Representing the earliest period of the subdivision of Registered Plan 1676, its elevated design is an important component in the built form history and evolution of its immediate neighbourhood.

     

    Heritage Attributes

    Design or Physical Value

     Attributes that contribute to the value of the house-form building located at 1 Weatherell Street as being a representative of the bungalow type in the Craftsman style:

    • The setback, placement and orientation of the building on its terraced corner lot at the southwest corner of Weatherell Street and Armadale Avenue
    • The one-storey scale, form and massing on a rectangular plan with gable roof
    • The materials, with the red brick cladding and the brick, stone and wood detailing
    • The corbelled brick chimney surmounted by three clay caps/pots
    • The exposed wooden rafters below the roof eaves
    • In the north and south gables, the original half timbering and decorative wooden double brackets supporting the gable corners
    • The two, flared, brick buttresses at the north and south ends of the east elevation
    • The arrangement of the openings with their brick headers and stone sills (flat-headed on the main floor and segmental-arched at the basement level)
    • The original leaded glass window pane designs, including the pattern and number of lights per pane
    • The covered, corner front porch containing the main entrance with its centred arch (north) and segmental arch opening and stairs (east)
    • The galvanized iron sheet metal gutters and downspouts, designed by the architect
    • The attached single-car garage at the south end of the property, with its wooden barn doors and detailing, each door containing four rectangular window panes
    • The single brick buttress at the south-east corner of the garage and the adjacent rear house entrance opening onto the paved driveway

    Contextual Value

    Attributes that contribute to the value of the house-form building located at 1 Weatherell Street as defining, supporting and maintain the historic character of the area and being historically, visually, functionally and physically linked to its setting:

     

    The setback, placement and orientation of the building on its corner lot at the southwest corner of Weatherell Street and Armadale Avenue
     

    Notice of Objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate

    Notice of an objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property may be served on the City Clerk, Attention: Administrator, Secretariat, City Clerk's Office, Toronto City Hall, 2nd Floor West, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2.; Email: hertpb@toronto.ca within thirty days of October 3, 2022, which is November 2, 2022. The notice of objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property must set out the reason(s) for the objection and all relevant facts.

     

    Getting Additional Information:

    Further information in respect of the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property is available from the City of Toronto at:

    http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2022.CC50.11

     

    • 1 Weatherell Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate - 18 Portland Street

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    TAKE NOTICE that Council for the City of Toronto intends to designate the property, including the lands, buildings and structures thereon known municipally as 18 Portland Street under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.O.18, as amended, as a property of cultural heritage value or interest.

     

    Reasons for Designation

    The property at 18 Portland Street is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under the categories of design/physical, historical/associative, and contextual values.

     

    Description

    The subject property at 18 Portland Street is located near the southeast corner of Niagara Street and Portland Street just south of Victoria Memorial Square within the King-Spadina neighbourhood. The former Toronto Hydro-Electric Systems Ltd. substation at 18 Portland Street, or Portland Substation, was designed in 1924-25 by the public utility's in-house architect Albert E. Salisbury (1887-1955) and completed in 1925. Similar to others in a collection of more than twenty substations designed by Salisbury between 1921 and 1950, the Portland Substation was designed in the Beaux-Arts tradition and features Edwardian Classical influences. Within that collection, it is recognizable as a two-storey, brick, factory/warehouse type building as well as for its metal entablature and sign band.

     

    Design and Physical Value

    18 Portland Street holds significant design value as a representative example of a 1920s-era Toronto Hydro-Electric Systems Ltd. substation in the Beaux-Arts style with Edwardian Classical influences. Distinctive features include the two-storey scale, form and massing of the property, its common bond brick exterior with decorative stone detailing, fenestration openings with stone sills and multi-paned, metal factory type windows, terracotta coping along the parapet of the flat roof, and the metal entablature containing the name band sign reading: "TORONTO HYDRO-ELECTRIC SYSTEM." The sign band held within the metal entablature is composed of projecting, stamped, metal lettering with distinctive font common to other contemporary Toronto Hydro-Electric Systems Ltd. substations.

     

    The principal (east) elevation, true to the principles of the Beaux-Arts tradition, features a largely symmetrical façade, its two-over-two configuration composed by the pairings of the first-storey window and principal entryway and the two second-storey windows above.

     

    Historical and Associative Value

    The Portland Substation at 18 Portland Street holds significant historical value for its century-long association with Toronto Hydro-Electric Systems Ltd. The Portland Substation forms part of the public utility's collection of early twentieth-century substations which were built across the city following its formation in 1911. This historical association is clearly expressed by the metal entablature and name band sign, with its distinctive typecast, identifying Toronto Hydro-Electric Systems Ltd. and referencing its former use.

     

    The Portland Substation also holds significant associative value as a reflection of the work of architect Albert E. Salisbury (1887-1955), who designed more than twenty substations between 1921 and 1950 as Toronto Hydro-Electric Systems Ltd.'s Supervisor of Architecture.  Salisbury is considered an architect of significance to Toronto's early twentieth-century history. The Portland Substation is architecturally similar to others designed by Salisbury in the 1920s and 1930s, including its near-twin at 281 Cherry Street. It is representative of Salisbury's expressive use of the Beaux-Arts tradition, adapted with Edwardian Classical influences.

     

    Contextual Value

    18 Portland Street has significant contextual value related to its importance in maintaining and supporting the early twentieth-century industrial character of the King-Spadina neighbourhood. Built within an industrial setting as the face of the public utility, the substation's Edwardian Classical details bring further contextual value to the property both for its association with the larger network of substations across the city and for its connection to its immediate surroundings. Featuring red-brick masonry, fenestration openings with stone sills and multi-light, metal, factory type windows, terracotta coping, metal entablature with name band, and symmetrical façade, the two-storey Portland Substation is visually linked to nearby former-industrial buildings, including the Copp Clark Publishing Co complex at 517 Wellington Street West.

     

    Additionally, the Portland Substation is functionally and historically linked to its surroundings as a structure that was built in 1925 to support the increasing electric power requirements of the King-Spadina neighbourhood. 

     

    Heritage Attributes

    Design and Physical Value

    Attributes that contribute to the design and physical cultural heritage value of the Portland Substation at 18 Portland Street:

    • The scale, form, and massing, of the two-storey, early twentieth-century, factory/warehouse type building expressive of the Beaux-Arts tradition with Edwardian Classical influences
    • The property's material palette, consisting of a common bond brick exterior with stone detailing
    • The symmetrical façade of the principal (east) elevation with its two-over-two configuration created by the pairing of the window and principal entryway (since altered) at street level and the two second-storey windows above
    • The factory type, metal windows on the first and second floors of the principal (east) elevation and side (south) elevation with stone sills and brick headers
    • The terracotta tile coping on the parapet of the flat roof.
    • The metal entablature on the principal (east) elevation with sign band reading: "TORONTO HYDRO-ELECTRIC SYSTEM," supported by slightly projecting brick pilasters at the north and south edges of the facade
    • The sign band's projecting, stamped, metal lettering with distinctive font common to other contemporary Toronto Hydro-Electric Systems Ltd. substations
    • The decorative, rectilinear courses of brick stretchers and headers which frame the façade of the principal (east) elevation

    Associative and Historical Value

    The following attributes contribute to the associative and historical cultural heritage value of the Portland Substation at 18 Portland Street as a representative work of architect Albert E. Salisbury's (1887-1955) portfolio, spanning from 1921 to 1950, as an important element of the Toronto Hydro-Electric Systems early city-wide infrastructure:

    • The former Portland Substation's defining Beaux-Arts styling with Edwardian Classical influences, including the symmetrical principal (east) façade with its red-brick exterior with stone detailing, fenestration openings, and flat roof with terracotta coping
    • The metal entablature with sign band reading: "TORONTO HYDRO-ELECTRIC SYSTEM"

    Contextual Value

    The following attributes contribute to the contextual cultural heritage value of the Portland Toronto Hydro-Electric Substation at 18 Portland Street:

     

    • The property's Beaux-Arts styling with Edwardian Classical influences, including its material palette of brick with stone detailing, that supports and maintains an understanding of the historic industrial character of the King-Spadina neighbourhood.
      • The metal entablature with sign band identifying the building as an electrical substation that distributed a vital source of energy to the surrounding industrial area.

    Notice of Objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate

     

    Notice of an objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property may be served on the City Clerk, Attention: Administrator, Secretariat, City Clerk's Office, Toronto City Hall, 2nd Floor West, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2.; Email: hertpb@toronto.ca within thirty days of October 3, 2022, which is November 2, 2022. The notice of objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property must set out the reason(s) for the objection and all relevant facts.

     

    Getting Additional Information:

    Further information in respect of the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property is available from the City of Toronto at:

    http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2022.CC50.10 

     

    • 18 Portland Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate - 551 Mount Pleasant Road

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    TAKE NOTICE that Council for the City of Toronto intends to designate the property, including the lands, buildings and structures thereon known municipally as 551 Mount Pleasant Road under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.O.18, as amended, as a property of cultural heritage value or interest.

     

    Reasons for Designation

               

    The property at 551 Mount Pleasant Road (including entrance addresses at 549, 553 and 555 Mount Pleasant Road), is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under the categories of design/physical, historical/associative and contextual value.

     

    Description

    The property at 551 Mount Pleasant Road is situated in Toronto's midtown, on the east side of Mount Pleasant Road between Belsize Drive and Manor Road East. It contains the Regent Theatre, a neighbourhood theatre from the interwar era that was constructed in 1927 to the designs of architect Murray Brown. Originally named the Belsize Theatre, it opened as part of the Famous Players chain and was designed to host both vaudeville and film entertainment. The physical presence of both stage and screen facilitated the adaptation between the two mediums on more than one occasion since the building's initial construction, contributing to its longevity as a community asset. The distinguishable roofscape of the brick and stone building, the marquee, and the projecting signage identify the property as a theatre, making it a recognizable local landmark. The property includes two integrated storefronts on the principal elevation, contributing to the intact historic village streetscape of this section of Mount Pleasant Road, as identified in the Midtown in Focus Planning Study. The property was listed on the City's Heritage Register in 1984.

     

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    The building at 551 Mount Pleasant Road is a representative example of an early 20th-century purpose-built vaudeville theatre along a neighbourhood main street, which were once common but are becoming increasingly rare. The two-storey scale at the property line with increased massing at the rear, the brick cladding with stone detailing, and the assimilation of the building into the contiguous commercial streetscape through the inclusion of two integrated storefronts are all characteristic of this typology. The use of Classical design language to project a sense of refinement is in keeping with the design tradition of vaudeville theatres, and is evident in the symmetrical arrangement of the façade, round-arched windows, and carved stone details. The roofline of the gabled centre bay flanked by flat-roofed sections to either side reinforces the focus on the marquee and projecting sign, which are also an integral part of the theatre typology. The design tradition of vaudeville theatre is also expressed on the interior of the building, including the surviving lobby ceiling that remains a tangible link to the original spatial arrangement and interior ornamentation of the Belsize Theatre.

     

    The subject property at 551 Mount Pleasant Road is valued for its association to the Crest Theatre (1953-1966), a highly influential repertory theatre company that helped to spotlight Canadian talent and establish the careers of a generation of theatre actors and playwrights. At the time the Crest Theatre was established, the Royal Alexandra Theatre was the only other permanent, year-round venue for live performance in the city, and the film industry was undergoing transition with the advent of television, leading many local cinemas to close. The Crest Theatre's founders, brothers Murray and Donald Davis, selected the theatre at 551 Mount Pleasant both for its location and because it had originally been constructed to host vaudeville entertainment, which facilitated the conversion to accommodate live performance. The Crest Hour Theatre, a touring company associated with the Crest Theatre, traveled to high schools across Ontario, further extending the cultural impact and legacy of the company.

     

    The subject property at 551 Mount Pleasant Road is also valued for its association with the architect Murray Brown (1884-1958). The Belsize Theatre at 551 Mount Pleasant Road was among the earliest of several theatres designed by Brown between 1926 and 1940. Brown is celebrated for his work on Canada's only surviving atmospheric theatre, the Capitol Theatre in Port Hope (1930) and Postal Station 'K' in Toronto (1936), and is a recipient of the Ontario Association of Architects' Honor Roll, which is only bestowed upon those who have made a significant contribution to the province's architectural heritage, either through their body of work or their influence in the wider community of design, education, and/or publication.

     

    Contextually, the predominantly two-storey height of the subject property, the delineated bays along the front elevation, and the ground floor storefronts with recessed entries serve to maintain the historical low-rise streetscape and consistent fine-grained rhythm of building frontages along Mount Pleasant Road between Davisville and Eglinton avenues. Located within the Glebe Manor Estate subdivision, the property supports the character of the area as it represents the early-20th century development of the neighbourhood as part of a prominent village main street in North Toronto.

     

    The building at 551 Mount Pleasant Road is historically, visually and physically linked to its setting, anchoring the east side of Mount Pleasant Road between Belsize Drive to the south and Manor Road East to the north. It is part of a contiguous row of commercial buildings with a shared setback constructed during the late 1920s following the introduction of public transit along Mount Pleasant Road.

     

    The contextual value of the former Belsize/Crest/Regent Theatre at 551 Mount Pleasant is also attributed to its role as a local landmark. The prominence of the building on the east side of Mount Pleasant Road is demonstrated through the larger massing at rear; gabled roofline and chimney that extend above the continuous streetwall height; and the projections into the public realm related to the building's historical use as a theatre, including a vertically-oriented sign at the second floor and a marquee and canopy above the front entrance, which have evolved over time.

     

    Heritage Attributes

    Design or Physical Value

    The following heritage attributes contribute to the cultural heritage value of the property at 551 Mount Pleasant Road as an early 20th-century purpose-built neighbourhood vaudeville theatre.

     

    Exterior Attributes:

    • The scale, form, and massing of the property as a two-storey building with a taller centre bay and increased massing at the rear
    • The property's material palette, consisting of brick with stone detailing
    • On the west (primary) elevation:
      • The gabled roof, chimney, and slight projection of the central bay, which rise above the continuous streetwall, giving prominence to the building
      • The wide dentils on the eaves of the gabled roof on the primary elevation
      • The tile coping on the parapet of the flat roofed portions of the property to either side of the gabled central bay
      • The continuous stone cornice that follows the roofline for the width of the elevation
      • The stone crest with the stylized letter "B" and the stone inscription panel reading "Belsize", in reference to the original name of the building
      • The four smooth, stone panels above the flat-headed window openings on the second floor
      • The original fenestration openings on the second level of the principal (west) elevation where there are two flat-headed window openings above each storefront, and three round-arched openings in the central bay above the theatre entrance
      • The stone hood moulds above the round-arched openings, with their fluted keystones that curve around the extrados in the form of a scroll
      • The stone lintels and string course above the flat-headed openings, which form a continuous band across the façade in conjunction with the hood moulds above the round-arched openings.
      • The presence and placement of a projecting sign aligning with the ridgeline of the gable roof reading the name of the theatre in combination with a marquee and canopy above the theatre entrance (historically supported by chains)
      • The placement of the main entrance doors in the centre of the primary elevation, slightly recessed from the property line
      • The two storefronts, with their composition comprising a low bulkhead, large glass display windows, recessed entrances that slope to the level of the sidewalk, and stone cornice above
      • The building's asymmetrical composition at the ground floor with a narrower storefront on the north bay allowing an entrance to the upper floor
      • The stone detailing on the extant piers including the 'teardrop' forms on the capitals
      • The stone detailing of the concentric planes on the north entrance surround

    Interior Attributes:

    • The spatial arrangement of a series of public spaces leading to an auditorium
    • The plaster ceiling with details of the sun, stars, flowers, and astrological symbols in the original lobby
    • The clear-span auditorium with vaulted ceiling and linear, ornamental plaster detailing arranged in a grid pattern
    • The extant plasterwork and other architectural details that reflect the original décor scheme relating to theatrical history and traditional vaudeville theatre design, including the satyr masks, wall mural fragments, and ceiling grilles in the auditorium
    • The inscription above the proscenium that reflects the original décor scheme, which reads "On with the dance let joy be unconfined"

     

    Historical or Associative Value

    The following heritage attributes contribute to the cultural heritage value of the property at 551 Mount Pleasant Road as reflective of the former location of a live performance venue important to the performing arts community and as a representative work of Murray Brown's portfolio:

    • The setback, placement and orientation of the building on the east side of Mount Pleasant Road between Belsize Drive and Manor Road East where it is part of a contiguous row of commercial buildings
    • The property's increased massing toward the rear of the building, which accommodated the historic use as an auditorium for both cinematic and theatrical entertainment
    • The presence and placement of a projecting sign aligning with the ridgeline of the gable roof reading the name of the theatre in combination with a marquee and canopy above the entrance

    Interior Attributes:

    • The astrological symbols in the plasterwork of the original lobby ceiling, which also featured in Brown's work for the Bedford Theatre.

    Contextual Value

    The following heritage attributes contribute to the cultural heritage value of the property at 551 Mount Pleasant Road as part of a historic main street commercial streetscape:

    • The setback, placement and orientation of the building on the east side of Mount Pleasant Road between Belsize Drive and Manor Road East where it is part of a contiguous row of commercial buildings
    • The scale, form and massing of the two-storey building with the rectangular-shaped plan
    • The property's material palette, consisting of brick with stone detailing
    • The delineated bays along the property's front elevation, consistent with the rhythm produced by fine-grained building frontages along the surrounding historic commercial streetscape and recessed entrances of both storefronts and the central commercial unit (historically a theatre).
    • The gabled roof and chimney of the central bay, which rise above the continuous streetwall giving prominence to the building, and the presence and placement of the projecting sign in conjunction with a marquee and canopy above the entrance, which serve to identify the property as a local landmark

    NOTE: the existing canopy, marquee, and projecting sign are not considered to be heritage attributes.
     

    Notice of Objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate

     

    Notice of an objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property may be served on the City Clerk, Attention: Administrator, Secretariat, City Clerk's Office, Toronto City Hall, 2nd Floor West, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2.; Email: hertpb@toronto.ca within thirty days of October 3, 2022, which is November 2, 2022. The notice of objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property must set out the reason(s) for the objection and all relevant facts.

     

    Getting Additional Information:

    Further information in respect of the Notice of Intention to Designate the Property is available from the City of Toronto at:

    http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2022.CC50.7

     

    • 551 Mount Pleasant Road Toronto Ontario