Item - 2017.EX28.2

Tracking Status

  • City Council adopted this item on November 7, 2017 with amendments.
  • This item was considered by Executive Committee on October 24, 2017 and was adopted with amendments. It will be considered by City Council on November 7, 2017.

EX28.2 - Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan - 2019 - 2038

Decision Type:
ACTION
Status:
Amended
Wards:
All

City Council Decision

City Council on November 7, 8 and 9, 2017, adopted the following:  

 

1.  City Council adopt the "Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan 2019-2038" as set out in Appendix A to the report (October 10, 2017) from the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation.

 

Summary of Recommendations - Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan 2019 - 2038

  

FACILITY PROVISION STRATEGY                                                                  

 

Community Recreation Centres


1.  Evaluate and pursue the revitalization or replacement of the following eleven (11) community recreation centres (listed in alphabetical order, not in order of priority) using the criteria proposed in the Facilities Master Plan. Unless needs suggest otherwise, replacement facilities will be similar in size to existing facilities.

 

·         Albion Pool and Health Club (Ward 1)

·         Dennis R. Timbrell Resource Centre (Ward 26)

·         Falstaff Community Centre (Ward 12)

·         Gus Ryder Pool and Health Club (Ward 6)

·         John Innes Community Recreation Centre (Ward 27)

·         Lawrence Heights Community Centre (Ward 15)

·         Masaryk-Cowan Community Centre (Ward 14)

·         Scarborough Centennial Recreation Centre (Ward 38)

·         Stan Wadlow Clubhouse (Ward 31)

·         Thistletown Community Centre (Ward 1)

·         Wallace Emerson Community Centre (Ward 18)

 

2.  Additional program space requirements may emerge throughout the course of this plan due to high growth and demonstrated needs, such as in the Thorncliffe area (Ward 26). In these cases, opportunities to expand or upgrade existing community recreation centres should be prioritized.

 

3.  Pursue the development of the following seventeen (17) new community recreation centres over the next twenty years (listed in alphabetical order, not in order of priority). This includes projects currently in the planning or proposal stage (11), centres required to fill gaps in distribution (2) and facilities to serve longer-term growth (4).

 

Community Recreation Centres in Planning or Proposal Stage:

 

· Bessarion (Ward 24)

· Davisville (Ward 22)

· Canoe Landing (Ward 20)

· Etobicoke City Centre (Ward 5) – proposed in 2004 RFR

· Newtonbrook site (Ward 24)

· North East Scarborough (Ward 42)

· North Rexdale (Ward 2) – proposed in 2004 RFR

· One Yonge Street (Ward 28)

· Shops at Don Mills (Ward 25)

· Wabash (Ward 14)

· Western North York (Ward 7)

 

Community Recreation Centres Required to Fill Gaps in Distribution:

 

· Central Etobicoke (Ward 4)

· Southwest Scarborough/McCowan (Ward 36)

 

Community Recreation Centres Required to Serve Longer-term Growth:

 

· Downsview (Wards 8/9/10)

· Downtown North (Wards 20/22/27)

· East Bayfront (Ward 28)

· Port Lands (Ward 30)

 

Gymnasiums

 

4. Revitalize gymnasiums as part of broader community recreation centre projects. Ensure that they have appropriate dimensions, change rooms, natural light, and incorporate indoor walking tracks where possible.

 

5. Evaluate opportunities to add gymnasiums to existing community recreation centres within under-served areas, with a focus on Scarborough.

 

Indoor Pools

 

6. Revitalize the indoor pool at Scadding Court Community Centre (Ward 20) and explore options for converting Harrison Pool (Ward 20) to other uses, with programming shifted to nearby facilities. Alternatives may be considered through the TOcore secondary plan.

 

7. Provide indoor pools within the following new community recreation centres (listed in alphabetical order, not order of priority), in addition to replacement centres with existing pools:

 

· Bessarion (Ward 24)

· Central Etobicoke (Ward 4)

· Davisville (Ward 22)

· Downsview (Wards 8/9/10)

· Etobicoke City Centre (Ward 5)

· Lawrence Heights (Ward 15)

· North East Scarborough (Ward 42)

· One Yonge Street (Ward 28)

· Port Lands (Ward 30)

· Shops at Don Mills (Ward 25)

· Southwest Scarborough (Ward 36)

· Wabash (Ward 14)

· Waterfront West (Ward 20) – partnered site

·  Wellesley Community Centre (Ward 28) – addition

·  Western North York (Ward 7)

 

8.    Evaluate geographic gaps in indoor pool provision, with a preference for adding aquatic facilities to existing community recreation centres. Gaps include: (a) Western/Central North York; and (b) Mid-Scarborough.

 

Outdoor Pools

 

9.    Evaluate replacement of the following pools and support buildings to support anticipated population growth, invest in high needs areas and address aging infrastructure (listed in alphabetical order, not order of priority):

 

· Alexandra (Ward 20)

· Glen Long (Ward 15)

· Irving Chapley (Ward 10)

· Leaside (Ward 26)

· Stan Wadlow (Ward 31)

· Wedgewood (Ward 5)

 

10. Evaluate the potential to repurpose aging and underutilized outdoor pools into facilities that are in demand. Potential candidates include (listed in alphabetical order, not order of priority):

 

· Flagstaff (Ward 2)

· Grandravine, Northwood, Oakdale, Stanley and/or Roding (Ward 9) – all are in proximity and most have lower usage levels

· Halbert (Ward 36)

· Knob Hill (Ward 38)

· Lawrence Heights (Ward 15) upon opening of the proposed indoor pool/community recreation centre

 

11. No additional outdoor pools are recommended.

 

Splash Pads and Wading Pools

 

12. Develop a strategy for the renewal of select wading pool locations, including the addition of water features to enhance the participant experience.

 

13. Over time, repurpose wading pools to other uses. The evaluation should reference the criteria identified in the Facilities Master Plan, including low levels of usage, deteriorating condition and proximity to alternatives. Potential candidates for repurposing in the short- term include:

 

· Coleman Park (Ward 31) – planned

· Geary Avenue Parkette (Ward 17)

· Kempton Howard Park (Ward 30)

· Northumberland Playground (Ward 19)

· Oakcrest Parkette (Ward 32)

· Sackville Playground and/or Sumach-Shuter Parkette (Ward 28)

 

14. Address ten (10) splash pad gaps through wading pools conversions. Potential areas include Wards 3, 13 (Ravina Gardens – planned), 16, 18 (MacGregor – planned), 19 (Fred Hamilton – planned), 25, 27 and 37.

 

15. Maintain the current level of provision – one splash pad per 24,000 residents – through the development of approximately 20 splash pads. This will be achieved through ten (10) new splash pads and ten (10) wading pool conversions within gap and growth areas, some of which are already identified in PFR’s capital plan. New splash pad development

should be prioritized in Wards 2, 3, 4, 9, 24, 25, 34, 41 and 43 (it may be possible for one splash pad to address more than one distribution gap).

 

16. Prioritize splash pad expansion and replacement in growth areas, where feasible.

 

Arenas

 

17. Explore opportunities to repurpose up to four single pad arenas to other uses. The Facilities Master Plan identifies criteria to guide this evaluation and has short-listed the following as potential candidates for consideration (listed in alphabetical order): Albion (Ward 1), Chris Tonks (Ward 12), Gord and Irene Risk (Ward 7), Grandravine (Ward 9), Habitant (Ward 7), Long Branch (Ward 6), Phil White (Ward 21).

 

18. Develop an arena replacement strategy to ensure that the City’s arenas can continue to meet long-term needs. Replacements should focus on facilities that are well utilized, but that need substantial capital repair and have significant design/functional challenges that would preclude their re-use. Future arena development should be in the form of multi- pad facilities and should coincide with the replacement of an equivalent number of ice pads from the supply. One potential candidate for replacement as a twin pad is East York Memorial Arena (Ward 31).

 

19. Provide one (1) additional ice pad over the next twenty years, for a total of 66 indoor ice pads (including Board of Management rinks). This will be achieved by the proposed Don Mills Civitan Arena (+1 ice pad) in Ward 26.

 

Curling Rinks

 

20. Maintain existing curling facilities and re-evaluate needs prior to major capital investment.

 

21. No additional curling facilities are recommended.

 

Outdoor Artificial Ice Rinks

 

22. Seek additional state of good repair funding to address aging ice-making equipment at outdoor artificial ice rinks.

 

23. Provide up to five (5) additional outdoor artificial ice rinks over the next twenty years, with potential locations in Wards 5, 8, 37, 39 and 43 to serve geographic gaps and future growth.

 

24. Continue to assess opportunities to add skating trails to existing outdoor artificial ice rinks. Provide a minimum of two (2) additional skating trails through expansions to existing outdoor artificial ice rinks at locations in North York and Scarborough.

 

Soccer and Multi-Use Fields

 

25. Upgrade 10 percent of all soccer and multi-use fields within the next twenty years (approximately 32 fields) to increase usage potential. These upgrades, such as converting fields to higher classes through improvements to field quality and supporting amenities, will enhance capacity by the equivalent of 6 to 7 new fields.

 

26. Provide access to 45 new soccer and multi-use fields over the next twenty years. Possible strategies include collaborating with school boards to improve facilities and community access, ball diamond conversions, field upgrades and planning for a future sports complex.

 

Ball Diamonds

 

27. Upgrade 10 percent of all ball diamonds within the next twenty years (approximately 34 fields) to increase usage potential. These upgrades, such as converting diamonds to higher classes through improvements to field quality and supporting amenities, will enhance capacity by the equivalent of 10 to 14 new diamonds.

 

28. No additional ball diamonds are recommended.

 

Cricket Pitches

 

29. Upgrade 10 percent of all cricket pitches within the next twenty years (approximately 3 pitches) to increase usage potential. These upgrades, such as converting fields to higher classes through improvements to field quality and supporting amenities, will enhance capacity.

 

30. Provide access to up to five new cricket pitches within the next twenty years. New pitches should be regulation size and may be shared with other uses (e.g., across two full size soccer fields). A variety of strategies such as partnerships with large landholders (e.g., schools, industrial areas, etc.), land acquisition and/or park redevelopment may be required to achieve this goal.

 

Tennis and Pickleball Courts

 

31. Identify and evaluate under-utilized public courts in well-served areas for conversion to pickleball, club tennis or multi-use sport courts. Prioritize the establishment of pickleball courts in the short-term through re-lining projects based on demonstrated demand.

 

32. Provide up to 20 tennis courts in growth areas that do not have equitable access to courts, such as Downtown Toronto (Wards 19, 20, 27) and North Scarborough (Wards 38, 39, 40, 41). Where feasible, new courts should be in the form of multi-use sport pads. Additional club courts may be established through club expansions, where feasible and supported by membership levels.

 

Basketball Courts

 

33. Prepare a strategy to identify and prioritize repairs and improvements to outdoor basketball courts, including opportunities to redevelop some as multi-sport courts.

 

34. Provide 30 new outdoor basketball and multi-sport courts within the next twenty years. Twelve (12) courts are recommended to serve gap areas (Wards 3, 4, 5, 10, 13, 22, 23, 31, 34, 40, 41 and 43) and eighteen (18) are to be provided in response to growth.

 

Bocce Courts


35. Convert under-utilized bocce courts to other in-demand amenities on an as-needed basis.

 

36. No additional bocce courts are recommended.

 

Lawn Bowling Greens

 

37. Convert under-utilized lawn bowling greens and support buildings to other in-demand amenities on an as-needed basis. Candidates for conversion should be evaluated further, including the Downsview (Ward 7), Humberside (Ward 13), Lakeshore Mimico (Ward 6) and Lawrence Park (Ward 25) lawn bowling greens, many of which are no longer supported by clubs and are not being actively maintained.

 

38. No additional lawn bowling greens are recommended.

 

Skateboard Parks

 

39. Evaluate options for skatepark renewal and replacement.

 

40. Consider the development of indoor skateparks within repurposed arenas.

 

41. Provide four (4) additional community-level skateparks, one in each district.

 

42. Develop up to 18 skate spots within smaller gap and growth areas across the city. The planning of these features should consider the site selection criteria identified in the City’s Skatepark Strategy, public input and park redevelopment opportunities.

 

Bike Parks

 

43. Develop a minimum of one bike park in Scarborough to improve geographic access.

 

44. Consider the introduction of smaller bike park features– similar to skate spots – within local-level parks, which may be phased in as pilot projects to test demand.

 

Dog Off-Leash Areas

 

45. Develop a strategy for improving existing dog off-leash areas. This will require a site- specific analysis.

 

46. Continue to use the City’s Dogs in Parks Strategy to evaluate the establishment of new dog off-leash areas. The need for new dog off-leash areas requires neighbourhood and site-specific analysis and should consider opportunities to work with the development community.

 

Sports Bubbles

 

47. Confirm the market demand for additional sports bubbles and associated activities and the circumstances under which the City would participate in partnered projects.

 

48. Should there be sufficient demand, examine stadium locations for their potential to accommodate winter bubbles for field sports, enabling the City to optimize these locations for year-round use. Lamport Stadium is a potential candidate for revitalization and enhanced capacity based on its location and attributes.

 

Support Buildings – Clubhouses, Fieldhouses

 

49.  Develop a strategy for support buildings to identify priorities for reinvestment and repurposing.

 

50.  Assess clubhouse and fieldhouse requirements based on the needs associated with the activities that they support.

 

SUSTAINED PUBLIC INVESTMENT IN EXISTING FACILITIES (STATE OF GOOD REPAIR)

 

Sustained Investment in Existing Facilities is a Priority

 

51.  Revise SOGR financial policies and practices to streamline and strengthen PFR’s ability to undertake projects in a timely and cost effective manner.

 

Possible strategies include:

 

a.  Revise the current SOGR policy so that the scope of the program is increased to include all potential remedial facility and equipment items that allows staff to proactively plan for and routinely address inevitable maintenance issues in a timely manner.

 

b.  Expand the definition of state of good repair to include items currently deemed to not have sufficient lifespan to qualify as a SOGR item (e.g. painting).

 

c.  Increase the Division’s purchase order spending limit.

 

d.  Increase the dollar threshold for distinguishing operating from capital projects so maintenance, repair and improvements that are currently considered capital project can be addressed as operational “minor maintenance” projects.

 

e.  Bundle capital improvements into a single project to achieve efficiencies and create a greater impact for users.

 

f.  Revise procedures to allow for the use of “blanket” contracts for common SOGR projects (e.g., mechanical systems, windows, roof replacement, etc.) to facilitate awarding contracts for these items before they fail.

 

52.  Maintain facilities in a safe, clean and attractive condition. Develop a process to measure facility condition, unplanned closures and their impacts, and any outstanding safety issues according to a systematic facility visitation program.

 

53.  Coordinate facility upgrades and renewal projects to minimize disruptions while maximizing outcomes (e.g., combine multiple work items).

 

54.  Establish dedicated funding for small-scale facility rehabilitation items (e.g., painting, sport court lining, lighting, etc.).

 

55.  Establish dedicated capital funding for large-scale facility revitalization and replacement projects.

 

56.  Develop new tools and practices to further enhance the City’s infrastructure management system, ensuring that capital renewal becomes an integral part of planning and prioritization.

 

Possible strategies include:

 

a.  Establish a preventative maintenance program to extend the lifecycle of major building components of PFR facilities. The program should address SOGR items based on anticipated useful life or industry standards for the item in question – such as pre-scheduled common area painting and refurbishment.

 

b.  Explore and develop a facility replacement approach to identify and replace facilities that are no longer efficient to maintain or situations where further reinvestment is not recommended.

 

c.  Consider eliminating or repurposing aging facilities that are no longer needed to maintain service levels.

 

d.  Develop strategies to maintain acceptable service levels during the period between when an existing facility is taken off-line and when its replacement is constructed.

 

e.  Develop a more dynamic asset inventory that can be used for strategic planning and tracking by multiple internal stakeholders.

 

f.  Establish qualitative measures that evaluate facilities for risk and criticality to assist with funding decisions.

 

g.  Create assessment management report cards that are shared with Council and the public.

 

POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS

 

Planning for the Future

 

57.  Adopt the Facilities Master Plan vision, principles and goals and use this strategic framework to guide decision-making.

 

58.  Update the Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan every five years, aligning with related initiatives (e.g., Parks and Recreation Service Plans, Parkland Strategy, Ravine Strategy, Census release, development planning, etc.) and City Planning studies.

 

Informing our Decisions

 

59. Develop evidence-based facility assessment tools and guidelines to improve database management and business intelligence.

 

60.  Planning for major capital projects will include meaningful community engagement, business plans that validate building program and service requirements (informed by demographic and socio-economic data, local needs, recreation trends and preferences, etc.) and consideration of potential partnerships.

 

61.  Establish guidelines for engaging residents, stakeholders and City staff in the planning of local parks and recreation facilities.

 

62.  Support provincial and national initiatives that increase support for facility-based information sharing, research and data collection.

 

63.  Improve the integration and cross-coordination of asset management systems (e.g., inventories, lifecycle costing, state of good repair, etc.).

 

64.  Require business cases (acceptable to the City) to consider new single-use facilities that accommodate sports or activities that have not traditionally been supported by the City. Continue to support existing lines of business that exhibit positive short- and long-term demand.

 

65.  Develop an approach to determine the contribution, economic benefit and impact that parks and recreation facilities have on the City’s social, cultural, environmental and economic status.

 

Collaborating With Others

 

66.  Work with service providers to understand their facility expansion and relocation plans in order to look collectively at the needs within the city as it continues to grow.

 

67.  Regularly communicate the Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan to internal and external partners to improve coordination, alignment and implementation.

 

68.  Be proactive in partnership development through regular communication and establishment of a standardized framework and/or criteria to simplify and expedite the partnership process.

 

Evolving Facility Standards

 

69.  Regularly review facility classifications, design standards and related guidelines and embed them into facility design and development processes.

 

Environmental Responsibility

 

70.  Embed existing policies and standards into facility design and development processes, including responses to climate change, environmental sustainability, energy conservation, accessibility, etc.

 

71.  Ensure that all major retrofits and new construction projects respect the Official Plan and other legislative requirements to protect and enhance the natural environment.

 

Accessibility for All

 

72.  Document and make publicly available information about the features at each parks and recreation facility, including those that are accessible to persons with disabilities.

 

73.  Emphasize flexible, age-friendly and barrier-free facility design, where appropriate.

 

74.  Wherever possible, ensure that new community-level parks and recreation facilities are located along transit lines and accessible by the trail and cycling network.

 

Reshaping Facilities

 

75.  Place a focus on creating public spaces, meeting rooms and year-round multi-use spaces that are digitally enabled (e.g., WiFi access) and can be animated through unstructured community use and programming.

 

76.  Establish criteria to guide the optimization and/or conversion of under-utilized facilities into spaces that are a better fit with changing parks and recreation needs.

 

77.  Evaluate smaller, single use facilities to identify opportunities to improve public access and operational efficiency.

 

Responding to a Changing Urban Fabric

 

78.  Consider new facility provision models that reflect the realities of high density residential communities, while ensuring convenient public access to needed spaces (e.g., recreation centres in condominium podiums).

 

79.  Consider the needs and strategies put forward in the Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan in the evaluation of surplus school sites.

 

Working as One City

 

80.  Explore and promote co-location opportunities with other City divisions, agencies and commissions, such as the Toronto Public Library, Children’s Services, Toronto Public Health, Employment and Social Services and Toronto Community Housing Corporation.

 

81.  Work with the City Planning Division to establish processes ensuring that the Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan is a primary resource in guiding and informing City Planning initiatives, including Secondary Plans, Area Studies and Section 37 (Planning Act) negotiations.

 

82.  Develop evaluation criteria and investigate opportunities with the Toronto Realty Agency for the strategic replacement of under-leveraged assets, while remaining focused on ensuring public access to needed spaces and services. 

 

Re-imagining City-School Relationships

 

83.  Evaluate the potential to negotiate public access to facilities supplied by other providers in areas of the city that lack municipal recreation facilities, for example at schools and YMCAs.

 

84.  Strengthen and modernize agreements with local school boards for achieving guaranteed and adequate public access, consistent maintenance and greater municipal oversight for needed parks and recreation facilities.

 

85.  Encourage partners – including school boards – to assist in meeting parks and recreation facility needs through the protection and renewal of community assets.

 

FUNDING THE PLAN

 

Funding for State of Good Repair

 

86. Increase spending on SOGR in order to create more resilient infrastructure and avoid higher capital costs in the future.

 

Possible strategies include:

 

a.  Address the backlog of deferred rehabilitation projects. This will also help to direct capital investment to higher risk aging assets and reduce the possibility of system failure and service interruption.

 

b.  Provide sufficient priority and funding for ongoing renewal and SOGR requirements, including when new assets are added to the inventory. Annual funding for ongoing SOGR requirements should be calculated as 2.1 percent of facility replacement values (including soft costs) and should be assessed on a regular basis.

 

Funding for New and Enhanced Facilities

 

87.  Maximize the use of Development Charges (DCs) in funding new capital requirements.

 

Possible strategies include:

 

a.  Consider area-based DC levies.

 

b.  Explore the applicability of DCs to address investment in facility funding across the city.

 

c.  Continue to employ a loan reserve as a funding mechanism when DCs and cash- in-lieu (CIL) are deficient to front-end land purchase, then reimburse when DCs and CIL accrue. Potentially this could be an arrangement with Infrastructure Ontario using the 505 Richmond approach as a model.

 

88.  Prioritize the use of density for benefit contributions (Section 37 and 45) for unfunded portions of planned projects.

 

Possible strategies include:

 

a.  Earmark and pool funds for larger scale projects that are supported by the capital plan.

 

b.  Direct Section 37 funds to cover the 10% improvement not covered by DC funding.

 

c.  Identify local needs and ensure that funds are used for a publicly vetted needs.

 

d.  Encourage City staff and elected officials to adhere to the process and priorities outlined in the Section 37 implementation guidelines.

 

e.  Discussions between City Planning and PFR must include local needs early in the planning process so that the potential of Section 37 funds can be brought to bear at the Site Plan Application stage (after zoning has been approved but before an actual plan is submitted).

 

89.  Use reserve contributions from the parkland cash-in-lieu (CIL) reserve (Section 42) to offset the costs associated with FMP implementation.

 

Possible strategies include:

 

a.  Where possible and after sites are selected, earmark CIL funds for specific projects.

 

b.  Enact policy changes to allow more flexibility in where “local portion” can be spent (i.e. explore how much more broadly the current 2-5 km spending boundary can be pushed) and explore possible protocol changes to allow for spending across Ward boundaries.

 

c.  Adjust DC forecasts in 10-Year Capital Plan to adopt more aggressive estimates (greater than 80% of past five-year average).

 

d.  Work with City Planning to consider: (i) increasing the Alternative Rate for parkland acquisition and park/facility development; (ii) increasing the City-wide portion to help fund projects in low growth areas; (iii) revisiting the current allocation between parkland acquisition and parkland development; and (iv) opportunities to align Facilities Master Plan funding and implementation with the Parkland Strategy.

 

e.  Prioritize DCs in high growth areas and CIL in non-growth areas.

 

Strengthening the Capital Spend Rate

 

90.  Increase PFR’s capacity to deliver on the volume of planned projects, including those recommended in the Facilities Master Plan.

 

Possible strategies include:

 

a.  Allow appropriate time for planning projects that reflects realistic spending capabilities.

 

b.  Explore new building and project management options to accelerate the pace that a new facility can be brought on-line (e.g., design/build, developer-built facilities, etc.).

 

c.  Explore the use of external project management resources to accelerate the pace that facility maintenance and remedial actions can be implemented.

 

d.  Develop facility design guidelines to support external services and developer-built facilities.

 

e.  Increase funding to hire additional purchasing staff to facilitate timely project planning or request for proposals documentation.

 

f.  Allocate additional staff resources for planning and project management of capital projects.

 

g.  Continue to ensure staff have the appropriate skills and training and are assigned to the relevant program area.

 

h.  Initiate public consultation well in advance of the planned start of the project to avoid unnecessary delays.

 

i.  Regularly review cash flow projects for the “readiness to proceed” and realign project timing where necessary.

 

Seeking Funding from Outside Sources

 

91.  Be proactive in the pursuit of partnerships as part of Facilities Master plan implementation.

 

Possible strategies include:

 

a.  Redefine the first order of project funding priority specified in the Capital Budget Financing Sources Policy to include funding contributions by potential project partners.

 

b.  Pre-establish the parameters that a partner must fulfill so that the expectations are known in advance. Use the One Yonge Street project as an example of a partnership best practice.

 

c.  Establish a standardized partnership framework using existing City approaches and materials.

 

d.  Build on the success of existing partnership models by promoting that the City is open to partnership proposals, but only after that protocols and project evaluation systems are in place.

 

e.  Explore partnership opportunities with the Toronto Realty Agency to maximize the inherent value of existing PFR infrastructure and other assets.

 

f.  Proactively match projects in the pipeline to the needs in local areas so that proposals can be offered to developers.

 

g.  Clearly link new facility provision to evidence-based demand and future growth to ensure that the City does not take on facilities that it does not need.

 

92.  Monitor and actively pursue grant-based funding.

 

Possible strategies include:

 

a.  Prepare studies that are routinely required to qualify for government grants.

 

b.  Maintain an updated list of “shovel-ready” projects.

 

c.  Prepare “talking points” that align with the goals of the Framework for Recreation in Canada to be used in future funding applications.

 

d.  Because grant applications are viewed more favourably if there is a partner component, line up partners in advance. 

 

ENSURING SUCCESS

 

Implementing and Monitoring the Plan

 

93.  Develop and implement a system for assessing progress and measuring success of the Facilities Master Plan. This will require understanding facility and program capacities, monitoring of facility usage, customer satisfaction levels, spending rates, dialogue with stakeholders, annual reporting on implementation and more (see Section 7.2).

 

94.  Develop and implement a communications plan following approval of the Facilities Master Plan to create awareness about its key messages and recommendations amongst residents and stakeholders.

 

95.  Reassess the direction, priorities and accomplishments of the Facilities Master Plan through an update in 2023 and at subsequent five year intervals, guided by the foundation provided by this comprehensive plan.

 

2.  City Council direct the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, in consultation with the Chief Financial Officer, to develop a Facilities Master Plan implementation strategy, in light of the City's broader Capital Plan, and to report back to the Executive Committee in second quarter 2018 for consideration in the 2019-2028 Capital Budget process.

 

3. City Council request the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation to have further conversations with Ward Councillors representing areas of extremely high growth to help inform the implementation report coming to City Council in the second quarter of 2018.

 

4.  City Council direct the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation to consult with local councillors on opportunities, to combine and/or co-locate, facilities as recommended in Appendix B of the report (October 10, 2017) from the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, in order to achieve the objectives of the Plan, and report back on these opportunities as part of the Implementation Strategy and/or as they arise.

 

5.  City Council request the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, as part of the evaluation of Sports Bubbles, to conduct an environmental scan of bubble enclosure innovations and update life cycle estimates and operating impacts of such enclosures.

 

6. City Council direct that, as part of the evaluation of the potential to repurpose aging and underutilized outdoor pools, the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation be directed to explore the possibility of enclosing either the Grandravine or Northwood Community Centre outdoor pools.

 

7.  City Council request the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation to work with appropriate City staff and staff at the Toronto District School Board to determine the terms and conditions that would allow use of Section 37 funds and/or Section 42 for refurbishment of school pools that were built by City of Toronto and are currently under long term lease for City of Toronto swim programs.

 

8.  City Council direct the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation to report back to City Council on the progress of the Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan every five years.

Background Information (Committee)

(October 10, 2017) Report from the the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation on Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan - 2019 - 2038
https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-107663.pdf
Appendix A - Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan 2019-2038
https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-107775.pdf
Appendix B - Summary of Recommendations - Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan
https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-107776.pdf
(October 20, 2017) Appendix C - Active Places (high level overview of the goals, recommendations and anticipated outcomes of the Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan 2019-2038)
https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108110.pdf

Communications (Committee)

(October 22, 2017) E-mail from Karen King (EX.Supp.EX28.2.1)
(October 22, 2017) E-mail from Hanna Uehre (EX.Supp.EX28.2.2)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Doug Campbell (EX.Supp.EX28.2.3)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Laywah Ang (EX.Supp.EX28.2.4)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Susan Bates (EX.Supp.EX28.2.5)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Liz Crawford (EX.Supp.EX28.2.6)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Sarah Gould (EX.Supp.EX28.2.7)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Allie Caldwell (EX.Supp.EX28.2.8)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Laura Higgins (EX.Supp.EX28.2.9)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Eric Code (EX.Supp.EX28.2.10)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Tracy Cook (EX.Supp.EX28.2.11)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Robert Fox (EX.Supp.EX28.2.12)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Clare Hudson (EX.Supp.EX28.2.13)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Bethany Good (EX.Supp.EX28.2.14)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Erin Britton (EX.Supp.EX28.2.15)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Katie Reid (EX.Supp.EX28.2.16)
(October 24, 2017) E-mail from Eric Code (EX.Supp.EX28.2.17)
(October 24, 2017) E-mail from Eric Code (EX.Supp.EX28.2.18)
(October 24, 2017) Letter from Barbara Payne, President, Electromagnetic Pollution Illnesses Canada Foundation (EPIC) (EX.Supp.EX28.2.19)
https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-73173.pdf
(October 24, 2017) E-mail from Raj Dosanjh (EX.Supp.EX28.2.20)
(October 24, 2017) E-mail from Sasha Boersma (EX.Supp.EX28.2.21)
(October 24, 2017) Submission from Katrina Miller, CUPE Local 79 (EX.Supp.EX28.2.22)
https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-73176.pdf
(October 24, 2017) E-mail from Karen and Bob Hutton (EX.New.EX28.2.23)
(October 24, 2017) E-mail from Miriam Johns (EX.New.EX28.2.24)

Communications (City Council)

(October 24, 2017) E-mail from Tracy Parks (CC.Main.EX28.2.25)
(October 24, 2017) E-mail from Joan Citulski (CC.Main.EX28.2.26)
(November 2, 2017) Submission from Alison Pope and John Corso (CC.Supp.EX28.2.27)
(November 4, 2017) E-mail from Melodie Barnett (CC.Supp.EX28.2.28)
(November 4, 2017) E-mail from Sol Chrom (CC.Supp.EX28.2.29)
(November 5, 2017) E-mail from Stephanie Campbell (CC.Supp.EX28.2.30)
(November 5, 2017) E-mail from Susan Bates (CC.Supp.EX28.2.31)
(November 6, 2017) E-mail from Maggi Burtt (CC.Supp.EX28.2.32)
(November 6, 2017) E-mail from Maggi Burtt (CC.Supp.EX28.2.33)
(November 6, 2017) E-mail from Benny Bing (CC.Supp.EX28.2.34)
(November 6, 2017) E-mail from Gregory Didycz (CC.New.EX28.2.35)
(November 6, 2017) E-mail from Lisa Reilly (CC.New.EX28.2.36)
(November 6, 2017) E-mail from Robert Fox (CC.New.EX28.2.37)
(November 6, 2017) E-mail from Tara Burke (CC.New.EX28.2.38)
(November 6, 2017) E-mail from Jody Todd (CC.New.EX28.2.39)
(November 6, 2017) E-mail from Geoff King (CC.New.EX28.2.40)
(November 6, 2017) E-mail from Karen King (CC.New.EX28.2.41)
(November 6, 2017) E-mail from Nancy Pike (CC.New.EX28.2.42)
(November 6, 2017) E-mail from Margaret Smith, Acting Chair, Joseph J. Piccininni Community Centre Advisory Council (CC.New.EX28.2.43)
https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-73451.pdf
(November 6, 2017) E-mail from Eric Code (CC.New.EX28.2.44)
(November 6, 2017) E-mail from Nicole VanKampen (CC.New.EX28.2.45)
(November 6, 2017) E-mail from Lorie Slater (CC.New.EX28.2.46)
(November 6, 2017) E-mail from Danielle Gilmour (CC.New.EX28.2.47)
(November 6, 2017) E-mail from Caitlin O'Donnell (CC.New.EX28.2.48)
(November 7, 2017) E-mail from Elizabeth Colquhoun (CC.New.EX28.2.49)
(November 7, 2017) E-mail from Beverley McKee (CC.New.EX28.2.50)
https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-73455.pdf
(November 7, 2017) E-mail from Vivian Wong (CC.New.EX28.2.51)
(November 7, 2017) E-mail from Rob Colquhoun (CC.New.EX28.2.52)
https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-73457.pdf
(November 7, 2017) E-mail from Susan Lamb (CC.New.EX28.2.53)
(November 7, 2017) E-mail from Matt Park, The Davenport Village Community Association (CC.New.EX28.2.54)
https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-73459.pdf
(November 7, 2017) E-mail from Danielle Wintrip (CC.New.EX28.2.55)
(November 7, 2017) E-mail from Emma Bongers (CC.New.EX28.2.56)
(November 7, 2017) E-mail from Emma Bongers (CC.New.EX28.2.57)
(November 8, 2017) E-mail from Barbara Payne, President, Electromagnetic Pollution Illnesses Canada Foundation (EPIC) (CC.New.EX28.2.58)
https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-73505.pdf
(November 8, 2017) E-mail from Ellen Warwick, Co-Chair, Friends of Earlscourt Park (CC.New.EX28.2.59)
https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-73524.pdf

Motions (City Council)

1 - Motion to Amend Item (Additional) moved by Councillor Cesar Palacio (Lost)

That:

 

1. City Council direct the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, in consultation with the Interim Chief Financial Officer, to report back to the Executive Committee in the second quarter 2018 on the impacts of the state of good repair of existing Community Centres that have reached, or are near the end of their life expectancy (35 years and older); such report to include a comprehensive and flexible plan that allows City Staff to enhance, expand, or replace facilities that become too old and the state of good repair is no longer financially sustainable, nor practical.

 
2. City Council direct that, if an aging Community Centre as described in Part 1 above serves a Neighbourhood Improvement Area, City Staff will conduct an assessment based on improved equity impacts that include socio-demographic factors for equity-seeking groups and vulnerable populations.

Vote (Amend Item (Additional)) Nov-09-2017 2:28 PM

Result: Lost Majority Required - EX28.2 - Palacio - motion 1
Total members that voted Yes: 15 Members that voted Yes are Ana Bail„o, Glenn De Baeremaeker, Justin J. Di Ciano, Paula Fletcher, Michael Ford, Mark Grimes, Jim Karygiannis, Norman Kelly, Mike Layton, Frances Nunziata (Chair), Cesar Palacio, Anthony Perruzza, Neethan Shan, Lucy Troisi, Kristyn Wong-Tam
Total members that voted No: 20 Members that voted No are Paul Ainslie, Maria Augimeri, Jon Burnside, John Campbell, Christin Carmichael Greb, Josh Colle, Gary Crawford, Janet Davis, Frank Di Giorgio, Sarah Doucette, John Filion, Jim Hart, Stephen Holyday, Josh Matlow, Mary-Margaret McMahon, Denzil Minnan-Wong, James Pasternak, Gord Perks, Jaye Robinson, David Shiner
Total members that were Absent: 10 Members that were absent are Shelley Carroll, Joe Cressy, Vincent Crisanti, Mary Fragedakis, Michelle Holland, Chin Lee, Giorgio Mammoliti, Joe Mihevc, Michael Thompson, John Tory

2 - Motion to Amend Item (Additional) moved by Councillor Maria Augimeri (Carried)

That City Council direct that, as part of the evaluation of the potential to repurpose aging and underutilized outdoor pools, the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation be directed to explore the possibility of enclosing either the Grandravine or Northwood Community Centre outdoor pools.

Vote (Amend Item (Additional)) Nov-09-2017 2:29 PM

Result: Carried Majority Required - EX28.2 - Augimeri - motion 2
Total members that voted Yes: 21 Members that voted Yes are Paul Ainslie, Maria Augimeri, Christin Carmichael Greb, Vincent Crisanti, Janet Davis, Glenn De Baeremaeker, Sarah Doucette, John Filion, Paula Fletcher, Mark Grimes, Jim Karygiannis, Norman Kelly, Mike Layton, Josh Matlow, Joe Mihevc, Frances Nunziata (Chair), James Pasternak, Anthony Perruzza, Neethan Shan, John Tory, Kristyn Wong-Tam
Total members that voted No: 17 Members that voted No are Ana Bail„o, Jon Burnside, John Campbell, Josh Colle, Gary Crawford, Justin J. Di Ciano, Frank Di Giorgio, Michael Ford, Jim Hart, Stephen Holyday, Mary-Margaret McMahon, Denzil Minnan-Wong, Cesar Palacio, Gord Perks, Jaye Robinson, David Shiner, Lucy Troisi
Total members that were Absent: 7 Members that were absent are Shelley Carroll, Joe Cressy, Mary Fragedakis, Michelle Holland, Chin Lee, Giorgio Mammoliti, Michael Thompson

3 - Motion to Amend Item (Additional) moved by Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam (Lost)

That City Council direct the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation to consult with Ward Councillors, to further study the population growth in downtown Toronto and re-evaluate the systems approach to area-specific facilities and service levels, and report back to the Executive Committee in the second quarter of 2018 for consideration in the 2018-2028 Capital Budget Process.

Vote (Amend Item (Additional)) Nov-09-2017 2:30 PM

Result: Lost Majority Required - EX28.2 - Wong-Tam - motion 3
Total members that voted Yes: 17 Members that voted Yes are Maria Augimeri, Vincent Crisanti, Janet Davis, Glenn De Baeremaeker, Sarah Doucette, John Filion, Paula Fletcher, Jim Karygiannis, Norman Kelly, Mike Layton, Josh Matlow, Joe Mihevc, Cesar Palacio, Anthony Perruzza, Neethan Shan, Lucy Troisi, Kristyn Wong-Tam
Total members that voted No: 21 Members that voted No are Paul Ainslie, Ana Bail„o, Jon Burnside, John Campbell, Christin Carmichael Greb, Josh Colle, Gary Crawford, Justin J. Di Ciano, Frank Di Giorgio, Michael Ford, Mark Grimes, Jim Hart, Stephen Holyday, Mary-Margaret McMahon, Denzil Minnan-Wong, Frances Nunziata (Chair), James Pasternak, Gord Perks, Jaye Robinson, David Shiner, John Tory
Total members that were Absent: 7 Members that were absent are Shelley Carroll, Joe Cressy, Mary Fragedakis, Michelle Holland, Chin Lee, Giorgio Mammoliti, Michael Thompson

4 - Motion to Amend Item (Additional) moved by Councillor Paula Fletcher (Carried)

That City Council request the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation to work with appropriate City staff and staff at the Toronto District School Board to determine the terms and conditions that would allow use of Section 37 funds and/or Section 42 for refurbishment of school pools that were built by City of Toronto and are currently under long term lease for City of Toronto swim programs.

Vote (Amend Item (Additional)) Nov-09-2017 2:33 PM

Result: Carried Majority Required - EX28.2 - Fletcher - motion 4
Total members that voted Yes: 23 Members that voted Yes are Paul Ainslie, Maria Augimeri, Jon Burnside, Josh Colle, Vincent Crisanti, Janet Davis, Glenn De Baeremaeker, Sarah Doucette, John Filion, Paula Fletcher, Michael Ford, Mark Grimes, Jim Karygiannis, Norman Kelly, Mike Layton, Joe Mihevc, Frances Nunziata (Chair), Cesar Palacio, James Pasternak, Anthony Perruzza, Neethan Shan, John Tory, Kristyn Wong-Tam
Total members that voted No: 15 Members that voted No are Ana Bail„o, John Campbell, Christin Carmichael Greb, Gary Crawford, Justin J. Di Ciano, Frank Di Giorgio, Jim Hart, Stephen Holyday, Josh Matlow, Mary-Margaret McMahon, Denzil Minnan-Wong, Gord Perks, Jaye Robinson, David Shiner, Lucy Troisi
Total members that were Absent: 7 Members that were absent are Shelley Carroll, Joe Cressy, Mary Fragedakis, Michelle Holland, Chin Lee, Giorgio Mammoliti, Michael Thompson

5 - Motion to Amend Item (Additional) moved by Councillor Shelley Carroll (Carried)

That City Council request the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, as part of the evaluation of Sports Bubbles, to conduct an environmental scan of bubble enclosure innovations and update life cycle estimates and operating impacts of such enclosures.

Vote (Amend Item (Additional)) Nov-09-2017 2:34 PM

Result: Carried Majority Required - EX28.2 - Carroll - motion 5
Total members that voted Yes: 23 Members that voted Yes are Paul Ainslie, Maria Augimeri, Jon Burnside, Christin Carmichael Greb, Josh Colle, Vincent Crisanti, Janet Davis, Glenn De Baeremaeker, Sarah Doucette, John Filion, Paula Fletcher, Jim Karygiannis, Norman Kelly, Mike Layton, Josh Matlow, Joe Mihevc, Frances Nunziata (Chair), Anthony Perruzza, Jaye Robinson, Neethan Shan, David Shiner, John Tory, Kristyn Wong-Tam
Total members that voted No: 15 Members that voted No are Ana Bail„o, John Campbell, Gary Crawford, Justin J. Di Ciano, Frank Di Giorgio, Michael Ford, Mark Grimes, Jim Hart, Stephen Holyday, Mary-Margaret McMahon, Denzil Minnan-Wong, Cesar Palacio, James Pasternak, Gord Perks, Lucy Troisi
Total members that were Absent: 7 Members that were absent are Shelley Carroll, Joe Cressy, Mary Fragedakis, Michelle Holland, Chin Lee, Giorgio Mammoliti, Michael Thompson

6 - Motion to Amend Item (Additional) moved by Councillor Jim Karygiannis (Lost)

That City Council direct the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation to consult with Ward Councillors, to further study the population growth in Scarborough, north of Highway 401 and re-evaluate the systems approach to area-specific facilities and service levels, and report back to the Executive Committee in the second quarter of 2018 for consideration in the 2018-2028 Capital Budget Process.

Vote (Amend Item (Additional)) Nov-09-2017 2:34 PM

Result: Lost Majority Required - EX28.2 - Karygiannis - motion 6
Total members that voted Yes: 15 Members that voted Yes are Vincent Crisanti, Janet Davis, Glenn De Baeremaeker, John Filion, Paula Fletcher, Michael Ford, Mark Grimes, Jim Karygiannis, Norman Kelly, Josh Matlow, Cesar Palacio, Anthony Perruzza, Neethan Shan, Lucy Troisi, Kristyn Wong-Tam
Total members that voted No: 23 Members that voted No are Paul Ainslie, Maria Augimeri, Ana Bail„o, Jon Burnside, John Campbell, Christin Carmichael Greb, Josh Colle, Gary Crawford, Justin J. Di Ciano, Frank Di Giorgio, Sarah Doucette, Jim Hart, Stephen Holyday, Mike Layton, Mary-Margaret McMahon, Joe Mihevc, Denzil Minnan-Wong, Frances Nunziata (Chair), James Pasternak, Gord Perks, Jaye Robinson, David Shiner, John Tory
Total members that were Absent: 7 Members that were absent are Shelley Carroll, Joe Cressy, Mary Fragedakis, Michelle Holland, Chin Lee, Giorgio Mammoliti, Michael Thompson

7 - Motion to Amend Item (Additional) moved by Councillor John Filion (Carried)

That City Council request the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation to have further conversations with Ward Councillors representing areas of extremely high growth to help inform the implementation report coming to City Council in the second quarter of 2018.

Vote (Amend Item (Additional)) Nov-09-2017 2:36 PM

Result: Carried Majority Required - EX28.2 - Filion - motion 7
Total members that voted Yes: 20 Members that voted Yes are Maria Augimeri, Jon Burnside, John Campbell, Josh Colle, Janet Davis, Glenn De Baeremaeker, Sarah Doucette, John Filion, Paula Fletcher, Mark Grimes, Jim Karygiannis, Norman Kelly, Mike Layton, Josh Matlow, Joe Mihevc, Anthony Perruzza, Jaye Robinson, Neethan Shan, Lucy Troisi, Kristyn Wong-Tam
Total members that voted No: 18 Members that voted No are Paul Ainslie, Ana Bail„o, Christin Carmichael Greb, Gary Crawford, Vincent Crisanti, Justin J. Di Ciano, Frank Di Giorgio, Michael Ford, Jim Hart, Stephen Holyday, Mary-Margaret McMahon, Denzil Minnan-Wong, Frances Nunziata (Chair), Cesar Palacio, James Pasternak, Gord Perks, David Shiner, John Tory
Total members that were Absent: 7 Members that were absent are Shelley Carroll, Joe Cressy, Mary Fragedakis, Michelle Holland, Chin Lee, Giorgio Mammoliti, Michael Thompson

Motion to Adopt Item as Amended (Carried)

Vote (Adopt Item as Amended) Nov-09-2017 2:37 PM

Result: Carried Majority Required - EX28.2 - Adopt the item as amended
Total members that voted Yes: 38 Members that voted Yes are Paul Ainslie, Maria Augimeri, Ana Bail„o, Jon Burnside, John Campbell, Christin Carmichael Greb, Josh Colle, Gary Crawford, Vincent Crisanti, Janet Davis, Glenn De Baeremaeker, Justin J. Di Ciano, Frank Di Giorgio, Sarah Doucette, John Filion, Paula Fletcher, Michael Ford, Mark Grimes, Jim Hart, Stephen Holyday, Jim Karygiannis, Norman Kelly, Mike Layton, Josh Matlow, Mary-Margaret McMahon, Joe Mihevc, Denzil Minnan-Wong, Frances Nunziata (Chair), Cesar Palacio, James Pasternak, Gord Perks, Anthony Perruzza, Jaye Robinson, Neethan Shan, David Shiner, John Tory, Lucy Troisi, Kristyn Wong-Tam
Total members that voted No: 0 Members that voted No are
Total members that were Absent: 7 Members that were absent are Shelley Carroll, Joe Cressy, Mary Fragedakis, Michelle Holland, Chin Lee, Giorgio Mammoliti, Michael Thompson

Point of Order by Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam

Councillor Wong-Tam, rising on a Point of Order, stated that she was no longer accepting the friendly amendment from Councillor Filion as the Councillor had subsequently moved his own motion, and, as a result, her original motion was before Council for consideration.

EX28.2 - Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan - 2019 - 2038

Decision Type:
ACTION
Status:
Amended
Wards:
All

Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:  

 

1.  City Council adopt the "Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan 2019-2038" as set out in Appendix A of the report (October 10, 2017) from the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation.

 

2.  City Council direct the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, in consultation with the Chief Financial Officer, to develop a Facilities Master Plan implementation strategy, in light of the City's broader Capital Plan, and report back to Executive Committee in second quarter 2018 for consideration in the 2019-2028 Capital Budget process.

 

3.  City Council direct the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation to report back to City Council on the progress of the Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan every five years.

 

4.  City Council direct the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation to consult with local councillors on opportunities, to combine and/or co-locate, facilities as recommended in Appendix B of the report (October 10, 2017) from the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, in order to achieve the objectives of the Plan, and report back on these opportunities as part of the Implementation Strategy and/or as they arise.

Origin

(October 10, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation

Summary

The Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan 2019-2038 ('Facilities Master Plan') reinforces the City's commitment to providing high quality parks and recreation facilities for all residents.

 

The Facilities Master Plan is informed by Toronto's growing and changing population and the ongoing high demand for parks and recreation programs and services. It is expected that over the next 20 years the City's population will grow by 450,000 people.  The biggest challenges of this growth will be land availability and cost.

 

Demand for Parks, Forestry and Recreation's (PFR) programs and facilities remains high. Our waitlists have grown from 90,528 in 2007 to 198,228 in 2016 even with new community recreation centres opening every few years. At this rate, waitlists could double to 400,000 by 2025.

 

The Plan commits to building new facilities and renewing our current assets to meet demand, and making the most of our current facilities while finding new and creative ways of providing services including partnerships with other divisions, institutions and developers.

 

The Plan aims to ensure provision is maintained and is consistent across the city. The current provision rate for community recreation centres is 1:34,000. See pages 21-22 of the Facilities Master Plan for current and recommended provision rates for all facility types. Recommendations will improve the distribution of facilities across the city and prioritize investment over the next 20 years. These have been informed by an evidence-based needs assessment that considered a wide range of inputs such as the location, age, condition and use of City facilities, demographic and recreation trends, current and anticipated development, and benchmarking against comparable municipalities.

 

Analysis has confirmed what is well known, our parks and recreation infrastructure is at risk of failing and we need to invest in new and better ways to protect our public assets. New and enhanced facilities are also needed to address existing gaps and respond to growth. In order to meet current and future facility needs, the Plan identifies the need to increase and improve how Parks, Forestry and Recreation invests in the state of good repair; revitalizes and replaces existing facilities; and develops new and enhanced facilities.

 

The Plan recommends:

 

- Reconfirming 14 community recreation centres proposed or in progress through the 2004 Recreation Facilities Report, 2017-2026 capital budget and plan, or through secondary or precinct plans. Ten of these projects have committed funding in the 10-year capital plan.


- Three new community recreation centres to fill gaps and respond to growth.


- Enhancing and replacing 11 existing community recreation centres.  Three are in existing plans, one is in negotiation and seven are proposed for replacement or enhancement.

 

Additional recommendations are provided for other facility types to also address gaps, growth and demand for services. A series of policy and process recommendations for modernizing the City's approach to facility investment, development and management are included as key considerations and recommendations.

 

A summary of the Plan's recommendations is provided in Appendix B.

 

Finally, the Plan includes a suggested implementation strategy focused on investing in the right facilities, at the right time and in the right places. Implementation considers a systematic, City-wide approach to provide access to services and opportunities for all residents.

 

A detailed implementation strategy will be presented to Council for approval in 2018. The implementation strategy will be informed by Council's adoption of the Facilities Master Plan, and will include the financial requirements to realize the Plan as well as timelines and specifics for all recommendations.

Background Information

(October 10, 2017) Report from the the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation on Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan - 2019 - 2038
https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-107663.pdf
Appendix A - Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan 2019-2038
https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-107775.pdf
Appendix B - Summary of Recommendations - Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan
https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-107776.pdf
(October 20, 2017) Appendix C - Active Places (high level overview of the goals, recommendations and anticipated outcomes of the Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan 2019-2038)
https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108110.pdf

Communications

(October 22, 2017) E-mail from Karen King (EX.Supp.EX28.2.1)
(October 22, 2017) E-mail from Hanna Uehre (EX.Supp.EX28.2.2)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Doug Campbell (EX.Supp.EX28.2.3)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Laywah Ang (EX.Supp.EX28.2.4)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Susan Bates (EX.Supp.EX28.2.5)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Liz Crawford (EX.Supp.EX28.2.6)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Sarah Gould (EX.Supp.EX28.2.7)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Allie Caldwell (EX.Supp.EX28.2.8)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Laura Higgins (EX.Supp.EX28.2.9)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Eric Code (EX.Supp.EX28.2.10)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Tracy Cook (EX.Supp.EX28.2.11)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Robert Fox (EX.Supp.EX28.2.12)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Clare Hudson (EX.Supp.EX28.2.13)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Bethany Good (EX.Supp.EX28.2.14)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Erin Britton (EX.Supp.EX28.2.15)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Katie Reid (EX.Supp.EX28.2.16)
(October 24, 2017) E-mail from Eric Code (EX.Supp.EX28.2.17)
(October 24, 2017) E-mail from Eric Code (EX.Supp.EX28.2.18)
(October 24, 2017) Letter from Barbara Payne, President, Electromagnetic Pollution Illnesses Canada Foundation (EPIC) (EX.Supp.EX28.2.19)
https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-73173.pdf
(October 24, 2017) E-mail from Raj Dosanjh (EX.Supp.EX28.2.20)
(October 24, 2017) E-mail from Sasha Boersma (EX.Supp.EX28.2.21)
(October 24, 2017) Submission from Katrina Miller, CUPE Local 79 (EX.Supp.EX28.2.22)
https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-73176.pdf
(October 24, 2017) E-mail from Karen and Bob Hutton (EX.New.EX28.2.23)
(October 24, 2017) E-mail from Miriam Johns (EX.New.EX28.2.24)

Speakers

Councillor John Campbell
Councillor Janet Davis
Councillor Shelley Carroll

Motions

1 - Motion to Amend Item (Additional) moved by Councillor Cesar Palacio (Lost)

That City Council direct the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, in consultation with the Acting Chief Financial Officer, to give further consideration to the Joseph Piccinnini Community Centre, including a cost analysis of ongoing maintenance repairs, potential liabilities due to health and safety issues, and how to implement flexible implementation strategies to renovate, enhance or change this facility when needed, for inclusion as part of the Parks, Forestry and Recreation Master Plan, in the forthcoming implementation plan in the second quarter of 2018.

Vote (Amend Item (Additional)) Oct-24-2017

Result: Lost Majority Required - Motion 1 by Councillor Palacio - Amend Item (Additional)
Total members that voted Yes: 5 Members that voted Yes are Ana Bail„o, Frank Di Giorgio, Cesar Palacio, James Pasternak, David Shiner
Total members that voted No: 7 Members that voted No are Paul Ainslie, Jon Burnside, Gary Crawford, Mary-Margaret McMahon, Denzil Minnan-Wong, Jaye Robinson, John Tory (Chair)
Total members that were Absent: 1 Members that were absent are Michael Thompson

2 - Motion to Amend Item (Additional) moved by Councillor Denzil Minnan-Wong (Carried)

That the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation consult with local councillors on opportunities, to combine and/or co-locate, facilities as recommended in Appendix B, in order to achieve the objectives of the Plan, and report back on these opportunities as part of the Implementation Strategy and/or as they arise.


3 - Motion to Adopt Item as Amended moved by Councillor Mary-Margaret McMahon (Carried)

Point of Order by Councillor Gary Crawford

Rising on a Point of Order, Councillor Crawford questioned whether Motion 1 by Councillor Palacio was germane to the item before the Committee.

Ruling by Mayor John Tory
The Chair accepted the Point of Order and ruled Motion 1 by Councillor Palacio in order as it related to the implementation plan anticipated in the staff report.

Source: Toronto City Clerk at www.toronto.ca/council